Intervention in Syria must be aimed at toppling Assad - or there's no point
By Nick Tyrone - 28 August 16:39

Token engagement would be equally damaging to both the west and to Syria. We should consider the costs of leaving the regime in the place.

Leader: Syria: the case not proven
By New Statesman - 28 August 15:26

There is nothing dishonourable in choosing between a bad outcome and a worse one. The risk remains that by intervening we will both widen and intensify the conflict.

Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial
Martin Luther King and the African-American fight for justice
By Bonnie Greer - 28 August 9:10

From fairly early on, the Civil Rights Movement, in many instances, was a carefully managed affair. Bonnie Greer examines the role of the black middle class in the Civil Rights Movement and the March on Washington.

What ever happened to Martin Luther King's dream?
By Gary Younge - 27 August 9:57

The horrors of segregation bound the US civil rights movement together. Fifty years on from Martin Luther King’s great speech, inequality persists – but in subtler ways.

What Chelsea Manning can expect in a US prison
By Jane Fae - 22 August 17:30

The soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning has announced that from now on she will living as a woman. What will life be like for a trans woman inside the US prison system?

Should Arab countries pay reparations for the slave trade too?
By Martin Plaut - 21 August 14:31

Fourteen countries of the Caribbean are seeking reparations from three European nations for the slave trade. While the British responsibility for the Trans-Atlantic trade rightly remains high on the agenda, perhaps there are other countries which should b

Germany - the EU’s 'exceptional nation' - sees no need for change
By Michael Hessel - 19 August 14:08

The country's voters show little desire to proactively seek a resolution to the euro crisis.

Egypt in crisis: "The body is evidence of the massacre, how can I put it in the ground?"
By Bel Trew - 16 August 12:22

Bel Trew goes inside the Cairo morgue where the bodies of Morsi supporters, massacred by the army, are waiting to be buried.

A statue of Nelson Mandela.
The less we remember about Nelson Mandela, the more we love him
By Will Self - 08 August 10:00

Will Self's "Madness of Crowds" column.

The courage of Bradley Manning will inspire others to seize their moment of truth
By John Pilger - 08 August 8:26

In 2010, Private Manning did his duty to humanity and supplied proof from within the murder machine. This is his triumph, and his show trial merely expresses corrupt power’s abiding fear of people learning the truth.

David Miliband: The decade of disorder
By David Miliband - 07 August 15:30

As he prepares to leave for his new life in America, the former foreign secretary explains why the financial crisis has not created an upsurge of support for the centre left – and why defensive opposition is not enough.

An Eritrean demonstrator waves his national flag during a demonstration
Britain leaves its Eritrean community at the mercy of government extortion
By Martin Plaut - 05 August 11:29

The Eritean community in the UK faces a relentless campaign to pay taxes both to the Eritrean government and to its armed forces on income they earn in Britain.

A view of Canton (Guangzhou) after an aerial attack in the war
China and Japan: the struggle for supremacy in the East China Sea
By Rana Mitter - 04 August 9:59

History and politics are coming together in a potentially toxic fashion in the East China Sea as China, motivated by memories of Japanese wartime atrocities, agitates for dominance in the region.

An honour guard lines up for the arrival of the US President
South Africa’s military meltdown
By Martin Plaut - 29 July 14:57

On the face of it, life continues as normal, but behind the scenes the South African military has been cut to the point where it's doubtful it will be able to live up to its African responsibilities.

How we are gentrified, impoverished and silenced – if we allow it
By John Pilger - 25 July 8:43

Momentous change almost always begins with the courage of people taking back their own lives against the odds.

We Need To Talk About Zimmerman
By Nicky Woolf - 17 July 12:47

In reality, nobody alive but George Zimmerman knows exactly what happened the night that Trayvon Martin was shot. In all the speculation, nobody is talking about the real problem: guns.

David Miliband's Ditchley Lecture: After the "decade of war"
By David Miliband - 14 July 9:31

The full text of the former foreign secretary's final speech before he leaves for New York to become head of the International Rescue Committee.

Why are politicians still pretending Ireland is an abortion-free wonderland?
By Anna Carey - 12 July 14:24

While our legislators bask in their moral superiority, thousands of Irish women have to travel to the UK in order to have an abortion, says Anna Carey.

US Secretary of State John Kerry and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
Whether we like it or not, the settlers have won. The two-state solution is now impossible
By Mehdi Hasan - 11 July 8:43

Whether we’re willing to admit it or not, Israel’s the Palestinian “peace process” is dead. There’s no hope of any success for a two-state solution.

Kevin Rudd: The people’s psychopath
By Erik Jensen - 11 July 8:27

Julia Gillard was ousted, and now Australia has Kevin Rudd again: the party’s answer to hatred of the party.

Nelson Mandela’s greatness may be assured – but not his legacy
By John Pilger - 11 July 8:17

When my interview with him was over, he patted me on the arm as if to say I was forgiven for contradicting him.

Why is Spain experiencing an English language boom?
By Anmar Frangoul - 11 July 8:12

Twenty-seven per cent of Spain's population is unemployed - over six million people. In a ferociously competitive job market, Spaniards see learning a foreign language as the best way of distinguishing themselves from others.

“Las Vegas rules don’t apply in Syria”
By John Bew - 10 July 8:45

Britain is trapped between David Cameron’s commitment to act against Assad and the intransigence of the Tory party. But could a new line from the US and shifting events offer a way forward for our foreign policy?

elson Mandela and his then-wife Winnie raise fists upon Mandela's release
From the NS, 19 January 1990: Mandela at large
By Ivor Powell - 04 July 18:26

After 27 years in detention the release of Nelson Mandela was awaited like a second coming. On the eve of the prison doors opening Ivor Powell wondered if he could fulfil these great expectations.

From the archive: An interview with Nelson Mandela on Bisho, de Klerk and the new South Africa
By Shaun Johnson - 04 July 18:12

On 7 September 1992, 28 ANC supporters and one policeman were shot dead in Bisho after protesting in an attempt to have the Xhosa “homeland” of Ciskei reincorporated into South Africa. Less than a month later, Shaun Johnson spoke to Nelson Mandela about h

Nelson Mandela: The mouse that roared
By Sarah Baxter - 04 July 17:59

From the New Statesman, 15 April 1994. The assassination of Chris Hani, the leader of the South African Communist Party, in 1993, proved a turning point. As the country threatened to erupt in violence, a date for the first multiracial general election was

The refugee crisis is destabilising nations
By Nabila Ramdani - 04 July 8:38

The greatest fear among all the countries involved, however, is about the kind of Syria that will finally emerge from the conflict.

Brazil erupts: Football, filthy lucre and fury
By Isabel Hilton - 04 July 8:21

Brazil is one of the world’s emerging powers, host of the 2014 Fifa World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. So why is the middle class increasingly angry?

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