The Armenian genocide memorial in Armenia. Photo: Flickr/z@doune
The Armenian genocide: the journey from victim to survivor
By Anoosh Chakelian - 24 April 9:59

The global activity around the Armenian genocide centenary is unprecedented – reality TV stars, western lawyers, Turkish intellectuals, metalheads and the Pope have all spoken out. But has this brought international recognition any closer?

Who asks websites who they should vote for, and who listens?
By Alan Wager - 23 April 16:08

The Internet is awash with vote-matching apps. But who uses them - and which party benefits most?

A shipwrecked migrant and child on arrival in Greece. Photo: Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty
Mare Nostrum and the high price of guarding “our sea”
By Daniel Trilling - 23 April 12:18

It seems that the British government views migrant deaths as a useful deterrent, but criminal activity remains unaffected by the decision to let desperate migrants drown.

Islamic State faces a complex web of militant groups and violence in Pakistan
By Samira Shackle - 23 April 10:14

The signs of Islamic State moving into Pakistan are there, but what difference does this make in a nation already subject to similar horrors?

A woman at work in the Who Made Your Pants workshop. Photo: WMYP
Why don’t you care who made your clothes?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 22 April 15:53

Two years after the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, in which over a thousand people died, we still fail to appreciate the human cost of the clothes we wear.

Big beasts: Francois Mitterrand, David Cameron and Barack Obama. Photomontage by Dan Murrell.
They may be ill-loved, ugly and tribal – but political parties are a necessity
By Mark Damazer - 21 April 9:24

In a world where depoliticising politics is sure to get a cheer on Question Time, the parties are key to keeping the system running.

It's not Ed Miliband who Vladimir Putin wants in Number 10
By James Bloodworth - 20 April 16:09

For all the Conservative scaremongering, it is their victory, not Miliband's, that will be cheered in the Kremlin

Exclusive: George Foulkes calls on Philip Hammond to intervene in the Mediterranean
By George Foulkes - 20 April 13:17

We cannot, therefore, continue to bury our heads in the sand, nor can we hide behind talk of a more comprehensive EU strategy. The simple fact is, unless more boats are sent out to patrol the region and rescue people, more innocent lives, including those of children, will be lost in the days and weeks to come.

The deaths this week are a wake-up call. We need a change of direction
By Tim Farron - 19 April 13:00

This latest horror is neither isolated nor unexpected. We can't sit by and leave people to drown.

Restart the rescue: the most important policy you've never heard of
By Stephen Bush - 17 April 11:57

400 people drowned this week in the Mediterranean. Here's what can be done about it.

Members of Keep Britain Out of the Common Market protest outside Chequers in 1967. Photo: Ann Ward/Rex
From the archive: J B Priestley on why Britain would be better off out of the Common Market
By J B Priestley - 16 April 14:54

Britain is not a super-ICI but the home of the British people.

Hillary Clinton at the world bank. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Can anyone stop the Clinton machine? Only time will tell
By Sasha Abramsky - 16 April 14:09

Coronations seldom proceed as planned in the drawn-out US primary season - the polish can't hold long without cracking somewhere.

Talking with terrorists is a dangerous business – but sometimes, it's the only way
By Richard Howitt - 09 April 15:38

In Colombia, the government and FARC are taking the first steps to a lasting peace.

Marine Le Pen. Photo: Getty
Marine Le Pen repudiates her (racist) dad Jean-Marie, calling his strategy political suicide
By Stephanie Boland - 08 April 15:53

Marine Le Pen has declared that her father Jean-Marie can no longer "hold the party hostage" following his recent remarks on the Holocaust.

Illustration: John Thys/AFP/Getty
The mystery president: How the Charlie Hebdo shooting saved François Hollande's reputation
By Charles Bremner - 07 April 7:52

François Hollande was elected on a promise to rule from the left, but proved an unpopular figure – until the January attack on Charlie Hebdo offered an unexpected reprieve.

We need to bring back the Blair approach to foreign policy
By Nick Tyrone - 02 April 15:50

As far as foreign policy is concerned, Britain's leaders would benefit from a lesson or two from Tony Blair.

Pope Francis. Photo: Associated Press
Beloved of the people: how the Pope has again become a leader for our times
By Maurice Glasman - 02 April 14:43

At a time when career politicians are held in such contempt, Pope Francis is offering a masterclass in leadership.

Among the ruins: a collapsed building in Vuhlehirsk, eastern Ukraine, destroyed in the fighting between Ukrainian and rebel troops in February. Photo: JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/GETTY
Vladimir Putin is fighting for political survival – by provoking unrest in Ukraine
By John Simpson - 30 March 9:44

Writing from Sevastapol, the BBC World Affairs editor John Simpson explains how the Russian president is stalling - and his Crimean coup is an attempt to distract the west.

Binyamin Netanyahu celebrates his re-election. Photo: MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images
Might Binyamin Netanyahu surprise us all - again?
By Uri Dromi - 26 March 16:50

Israeli PM Binyamin Netanyahu defied the polls to win re-election last week. Uri Dromes offers his quiet wish for statesmanship from the leader.

Muslim members of the opposition All Progressives Congress (APC) pray during the presidential primary of the party in Lagos. Photo: PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images
Fleeting loyalties and revolving doors in Nigeria as the election approaches
By Tolu Ogunlesi - 26 March 15:30

As the PDP and APC battle it out on the billboards, alliances continue to shift in a country defined by its political changeability.

Bright lights, big city: a bustling crossing in the Shibuya ward of Tokyo in 2013. Photo: MARTIN ROEMERS / PANOS
What the west can learn from Japan’s “lost decades”
By Roland Kelts - 26 March 10:18

Roland Kelts wonders whether Japan-style stagnation would really be so bad in the west.

Ukip MEP Roger Helmer falls asleep in the European Parliament. Photo: Twitter
An EU explainer for the easily bored: how much influence does the UK really have in Europe?
By Frances Robinson - 25 March 11:38

Frances Robinson tells us all we need to know about how successful Britain could be in a renegotiation of its EU membership.

European MPs attend a debate on the future of European Union at the European Parliament in Strasbourg on January 15, 2013 during a plenary session. Photo: Getty Images
An EU explainer for the easily bored: the cost to the UK
By Frances Robinson - 18 March 10:45

Frances Robinson continues her series on what we really need to know about the EU. This week: migration and the money.

The Labour Party needs to stop obsessing about public spending and concentrate instead on overhauling the state
By Jeremy Cliffe and Roberto Unger - 17 March 14:05

Forget the argument over austerity. Reform of the state should be the central mission of the left.

An imam reads the Quran at the Mosque of the Sultan in Morocco, 1917. Detail from a contemporary illustration by Maurice Keating.
Tom Holland: We must not deny the religious roots of Islamic State
By Tom Holland - 17 March 10:17

Its jihadis call for a global caliphate. So why deny religion drives Isis?

A woman watches the Crimea documentary this week. Photo: DMITRY SEREBRYAKOV/AFP/Getty Images
Vladimir Putin is not dead
By Stephanie Boland - 16 March 12:26

While his statements on Crimea are alarming, rumours of the Russian president's death have been – oh, you know how it goes.

Reading the ruins: Palestinian men survey the rubble after an Israeli airstrike on Gaza city, August 2014. Photo: Wissman Nassar/The New York Times
As Israel heads to the polls, peace in the region seems more distant than ever
By Jeremy Bowen - 16 March 10:44

Binyamin Netanyahu, Naftali Bennett, Yisrael Beytenu - each of Israel's potential leaders faces an uncertain future as the country votes.

Yo Soy Nisman: protesters in Buenos Aires. Photo: ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images
Bullets, pastries and the rise of the right: Mauricio Macri struggles to recover from a mysterious death
By Drew Reed - 12 March 12:35

The death of federal prosecutor Alberto Nisman provides an opportunity for the right.

Refusing to speak to terrorists is not only a lazy approach, but could lead to more deaths
By Harris Beider - 11 March 11:52

It is not only lazy to stick to an approach that precludes talking with terrorists, but probably means more decades of innocent people being killed on all sides.

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