Fighting talk: speaking for the opposition, David Granger said President Ramotar walks like a dictator
Letter from Guyana: the dictator as sitting duck
By Girish Gupta - 18 December 17:13

A constitutional crisis in a divided country. 

Barack Obama with Chuck Hagel. Photo: Getty
The departure of a third defence secretary finally kills off Obama’s hopes of a “team of rivals”
By John Bew - 11 December 10:11

Chuck Hagel's resignation - the latest soap opera to hit the Obama adminstration - is a sign of severe dysfunction. The team of rivals has disintegrated, with many of them becoming a thorn in the president’s side as he limps on for a final two years.

The foyer at CIA headquarters at Langley, Virginia. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty
CIA torture report: the UK must be honest about its complicity in these grisly crimes
By Donald Campbell - 10 December 10:02

What has been published by the Senate is just the tip of the iceberg – so far, the UK has successfully avoided a public accounting for the part it played in facilitating rendition and torture.

Star factor: Marine has modernised the FN's image but remains a divisive figure even in her own party. Photo: Getty
At the gates of power: how Marine Le Pen is unnerving the French establishment
By Charles Bremner - 04 December 10:00

Under her father, the Front National was the pariah party of  France. Now Marine Le Pen has brought it closer to the mainstream – and people are getting worried. 

Sweden: An anti-immigration party has brought down the centre-left government
By Harry Lambert - 03 December 17:19

Could Labour also fail to pass a budget next year, and trigger a second election?

The “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” installation at the Tower of London. Photo: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty
The First World War in Africa has been all but ignored – it’s time to remember it
By Martin Plaut - 28 November 11:20

How many of the vast sea of poppies at the Tower represented the contribution of the South African forces who died in the campaign to take the German colony of what is today Namibia?

Image by Andre Carrilho
Bonfire of the elites: how insurgent movements across Europe are on the rise
By Tim Wigmore - 27 November 16:02

The characters change but, essentially, the plot remains the same. The old order is being thrown out. Populists of a leftist, rightist and nationalist bent are thriving.

Ukip supporters in London, 10 November. Photo: Getty
Leader: The bonfire of the elites
By New Statesman - 27 November 14:49

Mainstream parties are under siege from populist parties on the far left and right, while a new tide of nationalism is also sweeping Europe.

Kosovo Albanians walk past posters featuring Kosovan Prime Minister Hashim Thaci in Pristina, 4 June. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kosovo: disarray in the heart of the Balkans
By Melanie McDonagh - 27 November 10:00

The small nation state has not had a government for six months and corruption and cynicism still rule.

A protestor holds her hands up in front of a police car in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty
Ferguson has reinforced racial fear and lethal stereotypes
By Peter Bloom - 26 November 11:44

As long as racial fear can be used to justify disproportionate force, killings like that of Mike Brown in Ferguson will continue.

Breaking up: Pro-independence activists after a symbolic vote on independence for Catalonia from Spain at a polling station in Barcelona on 9 November. Photo: Getty
Letter from Barcelona: Inside the battle for Catalan independence
By Jamie Maxwell - 20 November 10:00

This crisis could have been avoided. In recent years, Madrid has run a masterclass in how not to handle breakaway nationalism.

Pride, honour, poverty, patriotism: pro-Putin protesters parade through Moscow as he becomes president for the second time, May 2012. Photo: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin
Putin is not Russia: the Kremlin’s view on events in Ukraine
By Robert Skidelsky - 20 November 10:00

War in Ukraine, economic woes and the decline of an autocrat, by Robert Skidelsky.

Remembering: People gather to look the illumination on Boesebruecke bridge, where 25 years before thousands of East Germans first crossed into West Berlin. Photo: Getty
John Simpson: the raising of the Iron Curtain felt like a miracle
By John Simpson - 18 November 10:00

It all happened because of the use of a single German word, unverzüglich: “immediately”, or “at once”.

Berlin breach: the fall of the wall on 9 November 1989 changed the Soviet Union almost as much as Germany. Photo: Chute du Mur Berline/Gamma-Rapho/Getty
Why the fall of the Berlin Wall was a disaster for the right
By Simon Heffer - 08 November 9:00

To those on the right, the end of the Iron Curtain 25 years ago was a moral and ideological victory – but they have found some of the consequences dismaying.

Writing on the wall: Ifthekar Jaman in Syria, next to a stencil reading: "Islamic State of Iraq and Sham". He was killed in December 2013
From Portsmouth to Kobane: the British jihadis fighting for Isis
By Shiraz Maher - 06 November 10:00

What motivates the young men who leave Britain to join the murderous fanatics of Isis in the Middle East? Shiraz Maher spoke to dozens of them inside Syria to find out.

Wendy Davis, who looks likely to lose her bid to be Texas governor. Photo: Stewart F House/Getty
The US Midterms: the races you need to watch
By Nicky Woolf - 04 November 11:39

Rarely has an election elicited a louder national cry of “meh”. But there are some important races buried beneath the banality.

Red terror: Stalin combined "sociopathic tendencies and exceptional diligence and resolve". Getty Images
Ordinary boy to arch-dictator: Stalin and the power of absolute conviction
By Lucy Hughes-Hallett - 31 October 14:00

Stalin emerges from Stephen Kotkin’s book as that most frightening of figures – a man of absolute conviction.

Fort Kent, Maine, where nurse Kaci Hickox has become the centre of a political controversy. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty
Ebola is the latest political battleground between America’s left and right
By David Millward - 31 October 12:21

The febrile atmosphere of the mid-term elections has turned the response to the disease into a way of playing politics.

Guy Scott, who has just taken over as Zambia’s interim president. Photo: Monirul Bhuiyan/AFP/Getty Images
Zambia’s new president is white – and we need to get over it
By Martin Plaut - 30 October 10:53

The appointment of Guy Scott as Zambia’s interim president has been welcomed by the country's citizens. We should follow their lead.

Rather than waiting for a presidential knight or knightess in shining armour, progressives are getting back to basics and organising from the bottom-up.
How the living wage movement is re-energising the US left
By Jake Richards - 24 October 15:15

Rather than waiting for a presidential knight or knightess in shining armour, progressives are getting back to basics and organising from the bottom-up.

Echoing Roosevelt: Matthew Barzun greets President Obama at RAF Fairford in Gloucestershire on the eve of a NATO summit in Wales, 3 September. Photo: Getty
Matthew Barzun: Despite ebola and Isis, could it be that we are living in the best of times?
By Matthew Barzun - 23 October 10:00

Why are we intent on fixing our lens on the chaotic? And why do we insist on trying to weave a grand narrative out of mostly unrelated things? asks the US Ambassador to Britain. 

People watch from the Turkish-Syria border as Kurdish fighters in the city of Kobani fight Islamic State militants. Photo: Getty
Why arming the Kurds is the only option – even for anti-war progressives in the west
By Mehdi Hasan - 23 October 9:55

These Kurdish units, which include all-women militias, have to all intents and purposes become the last line of defence against the genocidal fanatics of Islamic State.

Oscar Pistorius in court. Photo: Getty
Oscar Pistorius sentenced to five years in jail
By New Statesman - 21 October 9:53

He also receives a three-year suspended sentence for a firearms offence.

Watching and waiting: tanks outside Kobane, where Islamic State forces are ballting Syrian Kurds. Photo: Ibrahim Erikan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Islamic State can be beaten
By John Simpson - 19 October 8:51

The jihadis are fighting on several fronts in two countries – and reports say that demoralised western recruits are increasingly repulsed by the atrocities they have witnessed.

Rainbow nation: Gnarr at the Reykjavik Gay Pride march in 2011. Photo: Helgi Haldorsson
Gnarr! How to fake it as a politician
By Kate Mossman - 16 October 15:51

In 2010, Jón Gnarr became mayor of Reykjavik by accident. Four years later, he’s relieved it’s over.

A woman kneels in a cloud of gas as she protests the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
In America, fear is growing that the police are getting out of control
By David Millward - 15 October 15:35

Barely a week goes past without a terrible incident, and too often the police officer is white and the other people involved are black.

Fukuyama has taken a series of consistent, uncompromisingly liberal-conservative stances on US foreign policy. Photo: David Levene/Guardian/Observer
Francis Fukuyama: “America shouldn’t have permanent enemies”
By Sophie McBain - 09 October 10:00

The American political scientist and author once predicted that liberal democracy had won the battle of ideas. Now he says political Islam is not a serious threat to the west and we should not intervene in Iraq.

There is usually a price when bloodlust goes unchecked in distant lands.
The long shadow of Isis
By John Bew - 04 October 15:45

There is usually a price when bloodlust goes unchecked in distant lands.

An aerial view of the Zaatari camp in Jordan, home to 80,000 refugees. Photo: Getty
Life as an orphan in a plastic tent city, bombing Iraq (again) and keeping my “Juslim” name
By Jemima Khan - 03 October 13:10

Jemima Khan writes from Jordan on the Syrian refugee crisis.

A refugee looks at the sea from Lampedusa Island in the Mediterranean. Photo: Getty
A year of Mare Nostrum: political impotence has stranded hundreds of refugee children in Sicily
By Jamie Mackay - 03 October 10:34

Since April this year 5,000 unaccompanied children have arrived in the small Sicilian town of Augusta, fleeing war and poverty in north Africa.

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