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Matteo Renzi. Photo: Getty
Don't overlook Italy's PM in the European Commission power struggle
By Ben Fox - 23 June 12:39

The tussle for the European Commission top-spot isn't just Cameron vs Juncker's supporters; Matteo Renzi, the Italian prime minister, is a key broker.

The shadow education secretary pushes Gove to say whether a Conservative government would allow for-profit schools to be established.
Tristram Hunt calls the Tories' bluff on profit-making free schools
By George Eaton - 23 June 9:37

The shadow education secretary pushes Gove to say whether a Conservative government would allow for-profit schools to be established. 

George Osborne. Photo: Getty
Osborne will announce a need for new high-speed rail: what are the political implications?
By Anoosh Chakelian - 23 June 8:12

The chancellor will announce today his idea for a new high-speed rail in the north of England to unite nothern cities. It's a strategic move for the Tories, while Labour still seems to be prevaricating over HS2.

Rachel Reeves. Photo: Getty
Rachel Reeves: Labour will "pause" Universal Credit if we win power
By Helen Lewis - 22 June 7:40

The shadow work and pensions minister says that Labour would not "throw good money after bad" on the troubled benefit.

MP announces that he will stand down at next election and says "it is clear that the leadership of the party wish to see new faces".
Blunkett's farewell shows there'll be no return for "the greybeards"
By George Eaton - 21 June 0:36

MP announces decision to stand down at the next election and says "it is clear that the leadership of the party wish to see new faces".

Welsh Labour sign. Photo: Getty
The Tories belittle Wales, but Labour is learning from it
By Owen Smith - 20 June 17:58

The Welsh economy is bucking generational trends and leading the UK out of recession.

Natural justice, not merely the law, must be seen to be applied in cases of wrongdoing.
The Mike Hancock saga shows that politicians can't be judged by the law alone
By Richard Morris - 20 June 14:26

Natural justice, not merely the law, must be seen to be applied in cases of wrongdoing.

Work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith. Photo: Getty
The Tories are set to breach their own welfare spending cap – here’s why
By Sheila Gilmore - 20 June 12:55

Despite all the distress and financial hardship caused by a malfunctioning assessment process, spending on the government’s main sickness and disability benefit is set to rise.

Nigel Farage. Photo: Getty
Nigel Farage seeks the limelight by teaming up with far-right MEPs in new European Parliament bloc
By Mary Honeyball - 20 June 10:25

Nigel Farage, who refused to join forces with Marine Le Pen in Europe, has teamed up with a party founded by white supremacists in a hypocritical move to up his own profile.

Children. Photo: Getty
The case for universal childcare lies in our collective social responsibility
By Reema Patel - 20 June 9:05

We need to be clear that care for children is a social responsibility that we all have – because children form the bedrock of our society, whether we choose to have them or not.

Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith. Photo: Getty
The government is tripping up on welfare – a blessing and a curse for Labour
By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 June 8:24

A slew of welfare stories this morning suggests the coalition is stumbling over its biggest bugbear: the benefits bill. Labour should play this carefully – in economic, not social, terms.

On this week's New Statesman podcast: Episode Fifty
By New Statesman - 19 June 16:43

Withdrawing benefits for the young, the science of ant sperm, and the rise of Isis.

The party would lose seven of its 11 most marginal seats to the Tories.
Lord Ashcroft's poll undermines the Lib Dems' optimism
By George Eaton - 19 June 16:04

The party would lose seven of its 11 most marginal seats to the Tories. 

Ed Miliband looks to get tough on Generation Y
By Emran Mian - 19 June 14:09

Labour's reform proposals may be radical, but only in the sense of the state retreating from helping young people.

Mother and child. Photo: Blowing Puffer Fish/Flickr
It’s a sad day when even progressives argue we should freeze child benefit
By Lindsay Judge - 19 June 14:00

Why freezing child benefit up to 2020 to pay for extended childcare for under-fives misses the point.

Jon Cruddas. Photo: Getty
How councils are already delivering the Cruddas agenda
By Simon Parker - 19 June 6:27

If you want to know what a Miliband government might look like, you should start by paying a visit to your local town hall.

With the old tax and spend model broken, Labour has been forced to be radical.
Miliband reimagines welfare for an era of austerity
By George Eaton - 18 June 22:00

With the old tax and spend model broken, Labour has been forced to be radical.

No matter the political situation, it's always the economics that triumphs in the end. Photo: Getty
The best currency for an independent Scotland would be Norway’s kronor
By Piotr Marek Jaworski - 18 June 17:10

If Scotland votes for independence, it will create a completely different economic context for the two new countries that emerge.

Mike Hancock MP. Photo: YouTube screengrab
Read: Mike Hancock MP's apology to a constituent who accused him of sexual assault
By Anoosh Chakelian - 18 June 15:29

Read the independent MP's full public apology to the woman who accused him of inappropriate sexual behaviour.

The party president contradicts Nick Clegg's position on a future hung parliament.
Tim Farron: Lib Dems must not rule out support for a minority government
By George Eaton - 18 June 15:02

The party president contradicts Nick Clegg's position on a future hung parliament.

The PM's blast against Jean-Claude Juncker delighted his MPs - but he'll let them down in the end.
PMQs review: Cameron should be wary of playing to the eurosceptic gallery
By George Eaton - 18 June 13:26

The PM's blast against Jean-Claude Juncker delighted his MPs - but he'll let them down in the end.

Fish and chips. Photo: Getty
No, Prime Minister, Magna Carta is nothing like fish and chips: here's what it really says
By Anoosh Chakelian - 18 June 13:16

David Cameron wants children to be taught about Magna Carta in his drive for “British values”, but here are some things the revered document actually says that may not come under that banner...

In this week's New Statesman | Sunni vs Shia
By New Statesman - 18 June 13:15

A first look at this week's magazine.

Technology can even free teachers from admin, leaving more time to devlote to pupils. Photo: Getty
The latest learning technology can raise standards of education for everyone
By Matthew Hancock - 18 June 12:25

To get the best out of it, investment in learning technology needs to be results driven.

Scottish Labour. Photo: Getty
Scottish Labour is finally waking up to its class problem
By Jamie Maxwell - 18 June 11:56

After years of complacency, Scottish Labour finally seems to be waking up to its class problem. But it could be too little too late.

Without new money, the health service will be condemned to years of dangerous decline.
The NHS funding crisis is now impossible to ignore - which party will grip it?
By George Eaton - 18 June 9:07

Without new money, the health service will be condemned to years of dangerous decline. 

Magna Carta. Photo: Getty
The PM lauds Magna Carta but his government undermines its greatest legacies
By Andy Slaughter - 17 June 14:57

Paying lip service to Magna Carta is all we can expect from a government that has done more to undermine the rule of law and the operation of the legal system than any in modern times.

Sixty per cent believe immigration has benefited Britain and are much more likely to be pro-EU.
Why graduates are the biggest obstacle to Ukip's advance
By Tim Wigmore - 17 June 14:48

Sixty per cent believe immigration has benefited Britain and are much more likely to be pro-EU.

Tristram Hunt. Photo: Getty
What happened to Tristram Hunt, and where is Labour’s radicalism on education?
By Dan Holden - 17 June 13:05

After a strong start, the shadow education secretary's voice is absent from the education debate, and his party is being reactive and not proactive on education. They have less than a year to turn this around.

The Labour peer and Miliband strategist on how the party would seek to reduce inequality.
Interview: Stewart Wood responds to Thomas Piketty
By George Eaton - 17 June 9:59

The Labour peer and Miliband strategist on how the party would seek to reduce inequality.

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