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By presenting himself to voters as who he truly is, the Labour leader has given himself a chance of winning their respect and understanding.
This week revealed the real Ed
By Marcus Roberts - 25 July 18:17

By presenting himself to voters as who he truly is, the Labour leader has given himself a chance of winning their respect and understanding. 

GDP figures may be misleading, but Osborne is benefiting
By Harry Lambert - 25 July 18:11

The UK economy has now grown by 4 per cent in eighteen months. George Osborne may yet be the next Tory leader.

“Instead of getting Jackanory, I got the Trades Union Congress”: Chi Onwurah MP
By Anoosh Chakelian - 25 July 15:20

The Shadow Cabinet Office minister Chi Onwurah on how her experience of the Biafran war informed her politics, why we need more scientists on the front benches and how Labour desperately needs more working-class MPs. 

By presenting himself as a man for "principles", not photo-ops, the Labour leader is seeking to ensure the election is fought on his terms.
Miliband's new leadership pitch is a gamble worth taking
By George Eaton - 25 July 12:15

By framing himself as a man of "principle", not one for photo-ops, the Labour leader is seeking to ensure the election is fought on his terms. 

On this week’s New Statesman podcast: Episode Fifty-Five
By New Statesman - 25 July 11:57

George Eaton and Helen Lewis review the year in politics, Sophie McBain on a mysterious commission in Libya, and history of football’s most enduring feuds.

Mortgage repayments could double for some London homeowners if rates rise.
Homeowners beware: Boris’s vision for the London economy
By Andrew Dismore - 25 July 11:49

What would a rate rise mean for Londoners? London Labour Assembly member Andrew Dismore warns homeowners of soaring mortgage repayments, defaults and repossessions.

The economy may be larger than ever, but for most people the recovery hasn't even begun.
GDP exceeds its peak - but most are still worse off
By George Eaton - 25 July 9:43

The economy may be larger than ever, but for most people the recovery hasn't even begun.

But which will benefit the most?
Labour and the Tories are both framing 2015 as a two-horse race
By George Eaton - 24 July 17:55

But which will benefit the most?

Why Ed Miliband should gamble on a snap election after 2015
By Owen Bennett - 24 July 16:46

After 2015, Ed Miliband should evoke the spirit of Harold Wilson and gamble on a snap election – not dither and drown like Gordon Brown.

Former shadow policing minister David Ruffley was cautioned for domestic assault on his former partner in March this year.
Tories investigate MP over domestic assault caution
By Lucy Fisher - 24 July 16:29

Michael Gove has launched a probe into Bury St Edmunds MP David Ruffley, after he was issued with a domestic assault caution earlier this year.

Is a return to constructive relations between Russia and the West possible?
By David Clark - 24 July 15:48

Russia may be destined to remain a source of instability and confrontation for as long as Putin remains in the Kremlin.

“But they have a space programme!”: untangling the foreign aid debate
By Richard Mallett - 24 July 14:09

Mainstream narratives about aid are clumsy and confused: here's how to talk about international development.

Debt and disability: the real cost of being disabled in Britain
By Stella Creasy and Kate Green - 24 July 13:24

Disabled people have seen their dignity and their budgets shredded under this government; Labour is looking to challenge this.

Heatwave: but part of the East Anglian coast contains some of England's poorest-performing schools: Photo: Getty
Ukip does well in areas with failing schools
By Tim Wigmore - 24 July 13:00

Great Yarmouth, Norwich and Waveney all fall in the area of East Anglia where Ukip recorded its best results in local elections. They also contain some of the country’s worst schools.

It is crucial that Britain takes the lead in defending human rights
By Simon Hughes - 24 July 12:06

Some Conservatives are desperate to see Britain withdraw from our international human rights obligations. They are wrong, argues the Justice Minister Simon Hughes.

The party says the existing target of 200,000 a year by 2020 is "ambitious but realistic".
Why Labour isn't going to promise a million new homes
By George Eaton - 24 July 11:44

The party says the existing target of 200,000 a year by 2020 is "ambitious but realistic".

The party says the existing target of 200,000 a year by 2020 is "ambitious but realistic".
Why Labour isn't going to promise a million new homes
By George Eaton - 24 July 11:44

The party says the existing target of 200,000 a year by 2020 is "ambitious but realistic".

Labour plans football tax to boost grassroots sport
By Anoosh Chakelian - 24 July 8:54

Labour is to propose new taxes on the Premier League and sports betting firms to boost sport at the grassroots level.

Too many households with modest means are shouldering too high a debt burden
By Gavin Kelly - 24 July 8:12

As we anticipate interest rates rising, how can the government help households in debt through the painful transition?

A wealth tax can help deliver real change for the common good
By Natalie Bennett - 24 July 7:44

The Green party's leader Natalie Bennett announces a new policy: an annual wealth tax to combat inequality in Britain.

The Arctic Monkeys sing of working class life, but used the Liberty tax scheme. Photo: Getty
Tax Avoidance: Why it stings more when it's musicians
By Luke Nightingale - 23 July 15:11

We expect corporations to dodge their civic responsibilities, but musicians are meant to speak for everyman. They leave Main St when they try to avoid tax on their millions.

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader".
Tom Watson: shadow cabinet cowards should back Miliband or step down
By George Eaton - 23 July 14:01

Labour MP criticises those who "use the cover of anonymity to make attacks on a leader". 

The MH17 crash has hardened public opinion towards Russia
By Harry Lambert - 23 July 12:15

Last Thursday's MH17 crash has changed perceptions of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict. Most voters now think the issue is a matter for the West, and support three specific policies.

Israeli soldiers at the border with Gaza today
Why the UK must end its military support for Israel
By Andrew Smith - 23 July 11:14

Andrew Smith from the Campaign Against Arms Trade argues that those who oppose Israel's actions in Gaza must acknowledge that Britain is implicitly supporting them through its military trade. 

In this week’s New Statesman | Summer Double Issue
By New Statesman - 23 July 10:56

A first look inside this week’s magazine.

Getting alongside – not on top of – teachers doesn’t have to be the soft option
By Marc Kidson - 23 July 10:18

The Institute for Government’s new case study on implementing the London Challenge should show new Education Secretary Nicky Morgan how to build an empowering relationship with teachers.

The Commonwealth Games begin: will they be a political spectacle?
By Anoosh Chakelian - 23 July 8:27

The Commonwealth Games will open in Glasgow today, and Alex Salmond has promised not to use them for political purposes. Will he keep his word?

The whip must be withdrawn.
Lib Dem MP David Ward: I would fire rockets at Israel
By George Eaton - 22 July 22:51

The whip must be withdrawn.

Surprise! White men are over-represented on Question Time
By Harry Lambert - 22 July 16:52

White men disproportionately dominate most fields, but even the BBC's flagship political panel show seems incapable of gender (or ethnic) balance. Then again, Westminster is far worse.

A man stabbed at Notting Hill Carnival in 2011.
Teens fleeing warzones are fuelling violent crime in London, youth crime summit warned
By Lucy Fisher - 22 July 16:12

The risk posed by traumatised asylum seekers was one of many themes identified at Labour's Youth Crime Summit in London today. 

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