Ed Miliband and David Cameron during the service to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster Abbey, on June 4, 2013. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Labour will show that people really do have a choice in 2015

Unlike David Cameron, we understand that our future success as a country is built on the talents of all.

As we enter the last summer before the general election, it is clear our country is at a crossroads. The Tories and Lib Dems complacently claim they’ve fixed the economy, but things are still really tough for hardworking families. Growth is finally returning to our economy, but it is not feeding through to working people’s living standards - that's why Labour is campaigning this summer for big changes in Britain. 

On Friday, Labour launched our summer campaign – "The Choice: the Labour future, the Tory threat" – with a speech from Ed Miliband in which he outlined the fresh leadership he will bring to Britain as Prime Minister. He said: 

"The leadership this country needs is one that has big ideas to change things, with the sense of principle needed to stick to those beliefs and ideas even when it is hard, and with the decency and empathy to reach out to people from all backgrounds, all walks of life."

In the weeks ahead, Labour will set out the changes we need so we can build an economy where we earn our way to higher living standards and shared prosperity. We know that Tory government after 2015 would continue to stand up for just a privileged few, thinking everything is fixed and continuing with a cost-of-living crisis, even whilst there is growth.

Labour understands that our future success as a country is built on the talents of all. In contrast, David Cameron believes the only people who create wealth are those at the top and that this will somehow "trickle down" to everybody else.  We want to ensure that families and young people can get on and do well - whilst under David Cameron, opportunities are declining and the next generation will do worse than the last.

Labour will make big long-term changes so that hardworking people are better off. We’ll make sure that 200,000 new homes are built every year by 2020, creating up to 230,000 construction jobs, and deliver a fairer deal for families who rent by banning rip-off letting fees and making long-term tenancies with predictable rents the norm. We’ll make work pay for working parents by giving them 25 hours free childcare for three and four year olds, paid for by an increase in the bank levy.  And we’ll improve school standards by guaranteeing that all teachers must be qualified, and transforming vocational education for the 50 per cent of young people who don’t go to university with gold-standard technical qualifications at 18.     

Labour will also take immediate action to deal with David Cameron’s cost-of-living crisis. We will freeze gas and electricity bills until 2017, as we reform the broken energy market to stop families and businesses being ripped off.  We will get the next generation into work, with expanded apprenticeships and a compulsory jobs guarantee for young people unemployed for a year or more – with a real paid job they’ll have to take or lose their benefits.  And we’ll introduce a lower 10p starting rate of tax to help make work pay and cut taxes for 24 million working people on middle and lower incomes – funded by a mansion tax on homes worth over £2 million. The list goes on. 

In coming weeks the shadow cabinet will be making speeches across the country outlining this choice.

Next week, Ed Balls will warn that David Cameron is standing up for a privileged few while hardworking families suffer a cost-of-living crisis. Andy Burnham will highlight the fall in NHS standards under the Tories and warn about further rises in waiting lists. Yvette Cooper will highlight the stark differences on policing. She will caution that if the Tories are allowed to continue their erosion of community policing it will soon be unrecognisable.

Others in the shadow cabinet will also be campaigning in August to highlight this government’s record of failure over the past four years, the danger posed by five more years of David Cameron and Labour’s positive vision for a Britain that works for all working people, not just a privileged few.

This marks a stepping up of Labour’s campaigning activity and what will be a relentless focus on the choice the country faces in just nine months’ time. We will be campaigning on "The Choice" on the doorstep and on digital media. And we'll be doing this across the whole country and especially in the key seats. 

The backdrop for this has been a week in which David Cameron has been defending a £160,000 tennis match with a Russian donor rather than tackling the cost-of-living crisis. He seems oblivious to the fact that his government’s cost-of-living crisis means hardworking people are £1,600 a year worse off than they were in 2010. Some people say us politicians are all the same. Labour is determined to show that in 2015, people really do have a Choice to make. 

Michael Dugher is shadow minister for the Cabinet Office, vice-chair of the Labour Party, and MP for Barnsley East.

Michael Dugher is Labour MP for Barnsley East and the former Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

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Metro mayors can help Labour return to government

Labour champions in the new city regions can help their party at the national level too.

2017 will mark the inaugural elections of directly-elected metro mayors across England. In all cases, these mayor and cabinet combined authorities are situated in Labour heartlands, and as such Labour should look confidently at winning the whole slate.

Beyond the good press winning again will generate, these offices provide an avenue for Labour to showcase good governance, and imperatively, provide vocal opposition to the constraints of local government by Tory cuts.

The introduction of the Mayor of London in 2000 has provided a blueprint for how the media can provide a platform for media-friendly leadership. It has also demonstrated the ease that the office allows for attribution of successes to that individual and party – or misappropriated in context of Boris Bikes and to a lesser extent the London Olympics.

While without the same extent of the powers of the sui generis mayor of the capital, the prospect of additional metro-mayors provide an opportunity for replicating these successes while providing experience for Labour big-hitters to develop themselves in government. This opportunity hasn’t gone unnoticed, and after Sadiq Khan’s victory in London has shown that the role can grow beyond the limitations – perceived or otherwise - of the Corbyn shadow cabinet while strengthening team Labour’s credibility by actually being in power.

Shadow Health Secretary and former leadership candidate Andy Burnham’s announcement last week for Greater Manchester was the first big hitter to make his intention known. The rising star of Luciana Berger, another member of Labour’s health team, is known to be considering a run in the Liverpool City Region. Could we also see them joined by the juggernaut of Liam Byrne in the West Midlands, or next-generation Catherine McKinnell in the North East?

If we can get a pantheon of champions elected across these city regions, to what extent can this have an influence on national elections? These new metro areas represent around 11.5 million people, rising to over 20 million if you include Sadiq’s Greater London. While no doubt that is an impressive audience that our Labour pantheon are able to demonstrate leadership to, there are limitations. 80 of the 94 existing Westminster seats who are covered under the jurisdiction of the new metro-mayors are already Labour seats. While imperative to solidify our current base for any potential further electoral decline, in order to maximise the impact that this team can have on Labour’s resurgence there needs to be visibility beyond residents.

The impact of business is one example where such influence can be extended. Andy Burnham for example has outlined his case to make Greater Manchester the creative capital of the UK. According to the ONS about 150,000 people commute into Greater Manchester, which is two constituency’s worth of people that can be directly influenced by the Mayor of Greater Manchester.

Despite these calculations and similar ones that can be made in other city-regions, the real opportunity with selecting the right Labour candidates is the media impact these champion mayors can make on the national debate. This projects the influence from the relatively-safe Labour regions across the country. This is particularly important to press the blame of any tightening of belts in local fiscal policy on the national Tory government’s cuts. We need individuals who have characteristics of cabinet-level experience, inspiring leadership, high profile campaigning experience and tough talking opposition credentials to support the national party leadership put the Tory’s on the narrative back foot.

That is not to say there are not fine local council leaders and technocrats who’s experience and governance experience at vital to Labour producing local successes. But the media don’t really care who number two is, and these individuals are best serving the national agenda for the party if they support A-listers who can shine a bright spotlight on our successes and Tory mismanagement.

If Jeremy Corbyn and the party are able to topple the Conservatives come next election, then all the better that we have a diverse team playing their part both on the front bench and in the pantheon of metro-mayors. If despite our best efforts Jeremy’s leadership falls short, then we will have experienced leaders in waiting who have been able to afford some distance from the front-bench, untainted and able to take the party’s plan B forward.