Boris Johnson: Drop the hair shirt approach, George Osborne

In the wake of the negative GDP figures, the London mayor joins the chorus of voices questioning austerity.

Et tu, Boris? On Thursday, Nick Clegg stuck the knife into George Osborne's reputation for economic strategy by declaring that the coalition had cut capital spending too harshly in its early days.

Yesterday, in the wake of GDP figures showing the economy shrank by 0.3 per cent in the final quarter of 2012 - pushing Britain closer to a triple-dip recession - Boris Johnson also publicly questioned the Chancellor's appraoch.

From Davos, he said it was time to "junk the rhetoric of austerity" in favour of boosting jobs and growth. "The single biggest inhibitor of demand is lack of confidence. If only some of the people in this room would invest some of the cash in their balance sheets we would see that confidence rewarded in a virtuous circle."

Johnson carefully moderated his criticisms by ostensibly directing them at the Bank of England, saying:

"There is huge potential in the UK. It is important we have the spirit of confidence. Some of the mutterings from Threadneedle Street are not the stuff to give the troops. We need investment in housing and transport, things that make a big difference."

While he supported Osborne's deficit-reduction plan, Johnson said he wanted more investment in growth-boosting infrastructure measures. He added that "the hair-shirt, Stafford Cripps agenda is not the way to get Britain moving again".

In the near future, the Guardian reports, Johnson's new economic adviser Gerard Lyons will publish the Mayor's "seven-point plan" for London, which includes building a new airport and hundreds of thousands of homes, as well as investing in transport infrastructure. 

Boris Johnson. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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