Guardian's animation team will bore you into caring about NSA

Think you're bored of Edward Snowden? Wrong! There are new depths of boredom you have yet to plunge into.

The Guardian has been running through the revelations of Edward Snowden for several months now, and we wouldn’t blame you if your mind has drifted away to other things. Yes, there’s a surveillance nightmare surrounding us; yes, it’s all so terrible. But that doesn’t mean we don’t care.

However, to try and get us to expressly tell everyone how much we care, the Guardian has produced “The NSA files: how they affect you”. Warning: it is patronising.

Who is this NSA PSA for? Kids will see through the animation - just see the way Margaret and Joe ‘collapse’ at the end there for shoddiness that would put Family Guy to shame - while adults will wonder why they only bothered recording one side of the conversation these people appear to be having.

Or maybe it's all a foil, to make us care even less.

Joe and Margaret. (Screenshot: The Guardian)

I'm a mole, innit.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.