Capsules containing ketamine. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP
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Could ketamine stop suicide?

The drug has been proven as a reliever of suicidal thoughts. With some doctors reluctant to prescribe SSRIs, it could provide the answer.

If suicide is the question, could ketamine be the answer? Nick Clegg has suggested suicide is avoidable in a well-structured NHS, but targeting the right people remains a complex issue.

It’s not just about depression, as the case of a 65-year-old woman who made a shocking announcement to her doctors demonstrated. “I’m fed up with life, I’ve had enough,” she said. “I don’t want to live any more . . . I no longer wish to live, to see anything, hear anything, feel anything . . .”

This was shocking because the feelings were induced not by depression, but by electrical stimulation of the brain. It was an unexpected side effect of an experimental treatment for Parkinson’s disease.

Applying a current through electrodes implanted in the patient’s brain was meant to alleviate tremors; instead, it brought on suicidal thoughts within five seconds, and 90 seconds after turning it off they were gone. Then came roughly five minutes of euphoria and general larking about.

This remarkable finding, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999, was one of the first to suggest that suicide and depression are not as inextricably linked as we might imagine.

We have more recent data, too. Ten years have passed since we discovered a link between suicidal thoughts and the antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Doctors became much more wary about prescribing SSRIs but the results were not as we’d hoped.

A Swedish study found that after warnings about SSRIs were issued in 2004, the suicide rate among ten-to-19-year-olds increased for five consecutive years – the largest group being those who were not prescribed antidepressants. In the US, child and adolescent suicide rates have risen by 14 per cent.

Two US-based researchers, Robert Gibbons and J John Mann, argue it is time to review the FDA warning. Writing in the Psychiatric Times, they point out that subsequent research has shown a complex relationship between suicide contemplation, depression and antidepressants. The result of the warning has not been a lower suicide rate. “Instead, we see fewer antidepressant prescriptions, an increase in youth suicides, and negative effects on human capital.”

The Parkinson’s patient’s experience – especially, perhaps, the euphoria and larking about – suggests that ketamine, the newest route to alleviating suicidal thoughts, might be more successful.

Most people know ketamine – if they know it at all – as a party drug. Though it was first developed as an anaesthetic, it can elicit euphoria at lower doses. We now know, thanks to a study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research in December, that ketamine is also a useful reliever of suicidal thoughts.

By giving 133 patients a dose of ketamine, researchers teased apart the links between suicidal thoughts, depression and anxiety, and they found that, although ketamine does relieve depression and anxiety, its effect on suicidal ideation is far stronger than on either of these. The effect is rapid – some patients report their contemplation of suicide gone within a couple of hours. According to a report in Nature, many pharmaceutical companies are now accelerating their ketamine research.

There are plenty of wrinkles to iron out. How would we set the threshold of eligibility? And how much autonomy do we give people? Where people are under the care of the state, all means for suicide are removed from those deemed at risk. Would we sanction a ketamine shot – or a routine of ketamine shots – as a mandatory measure to be used along with removal of belt and shoelaces? Or for anyone deemed to be a danger to themselves? If Clegg gets his way, we may soon find out. 

Michael Brooks holds a PhD in quantum physics. He writes a weekly science column for the New Statesman, and his most recent book is At the Edge of Uncertainty: 11 Discoveries Taking Science by Surprise.

This article first appeared in the 23 January 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Christianity in the Middle East

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Theresa May’s stage-managed election campaign keeps the public at bay

Jeremy Corbyn’s approach may be chaotic, but at least it’s more authentic.

The worst part about running an election campaign for a politician? Having to meet the general public. Those ordinary folk can be a tricky lot, with their lack of regard for being on-message, and their pesky real-life concerns.

But it looks like Theresa May has decided to avoid this inconvenience altogether during this snap general election campaign, as it turns out her visit to Leeds last night was so stage-managed that she barely had to face the public.

Accusations have been whizzing around online that at a campaign event at the Shine building in Leeds, the Prime Minister spoke to a room full of guests invited by the party, rather than local people or people who work in the building’s office space.

The Telegraph’s Chris Hope tweeted a picture of the room in which May was addressing her audience yesterday evening a little before 7pm. He pointed out that, being in Leeds, she was in “Labour territory”:

But a few locals who spied this picture online claimed that the audience did not look like who you’d expect to see congregated at Shine – a grade II-listed Victorian school that has been renovated into a community project housing office space and meeting rooms.

“Ask why she didn’t meet any of the people at the business who work in that beautiful building. Everyone there was an invite-only Tory,” tweeted Rik Kendell, a Leeds-based developer and designer who says he works in the Shine building. “She didn’t arrive until we’d all left for the day. Everyone in the building past 6pm was invite-only . . . They seemed to seek out the most clinical corner for their PR photos. Such a beautiful building to work in.”

Other tweeters also found the snapshot jarring:

Shine’s founders have pointed out that they didn’t host or invite Theresa May – rather the party hired out the space for a private event: “All visitors pay for meeting space in Shine and we do not seek out, bid for, or otherwise host any political parties,” wrote managing director Dawn O'Keefe. The guestlist was not down to Shine, but to the Tory party.

The audience consisted of journalists and around 150 Tory activists, according to the Guardian. This was instead of employees from the 16 offices housed in the building. I have asked the Conservative Party for clarification of who was in the audience and whether it was invite-only and am awaiting its response.

Jeremy Corbyn accused May of “hiding from the public”, and local Labour MP Richard Burgon commented that, “like a medieval monarch, she simply briefly relocated her travelling court of admirers to town and then moved on without so much as a nod to the people she considers to be her lowly subjects”.

But it doesn’t look like the Tories’ painstaking stage-management is a fool-proof plan. Having uniform audiences of the party faithful on the campaign trail seems to be confusing the Prime Minister somewhat. During a visit to a (rather sparsely populated) factory in Clay Cross, Derbyshire, yesterday, she appeared to forget where exactly on the campaign trail she was:

The management of Corbyn’s campaign has also resulted in gaffes – but for opposite reasons. A slightly more chaotic approach has led to him facing the wrong way, with his back to the cameras.

Corbyn’s blunder is born out of his instinct to address the crowd rather than the cameras – May’s problem is the other way round. Both, however, seem far more comfortable talking to the party faithful, even if they are venturing out of safe seat territory.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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