David Miliband to guest-edit next week's New Statesman

Issue to focus on shifts in world power.

A special issue featuring essays, columns and interviews ­— with
Hillary Clinton, Kevin Rudd, Richard Branson, Michael Semple interview with Taliban leader, Tony Blair, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Russell Brand, Ed Miliband, David Walliams, Jonathan Coe, Jo Brand, Ozwald Boateng and many others

For this 80-page edition, David Miliband has commissioned a series of articles around the theme of shifts in world power.

David Miliband said:

“For many years I have wanted to tell New Statesman readers what really matters — so when Jason Cowley asked me to guest-edit an issue it was a challenge I couldn’t resist!

“This is an extraordinary time of economic and political change around the world that is immensely challenging for the west and for the left. So I have produced an issue that tries to explain the big drivers of change in the world, and how the west and the left should react.

“The issue reflects what I care about — from South Shields to human rights to what makes me smile or laugh. And I have tried to produce an issue that is passionate without shouting and uses reason without being technocratic.”

Jason Cowley, editor of the New Statesman, said:

“I asked David to guest-edit because we wanted to produce an issue exploring the great challenges facing the world in what is a period of profound and uneasy transition as power shifts from west to east and the old European social-democratic model becomes unsustainable. As a former foreign secretary and one of our most intellectually capable politicians, he was ideally placed to gather together leading thinkers and politicians in one issue of the New Statesman.

“Our guest-edited issues have proved hugely popular with our readers as well as being great journalistic successes. This one will be no different.”

The issue, cover-dated 16 July, will be on sale in London on Thursday 12 July and in the rest of the country from Friday 13 July. International buyers can obtain copies on our website at www.newstatesman.com.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

David Miliband is the New Statesman’s seventh guest editor, after Alastair Campbell, Ken Livingstone, Melvyn Bragg, Jemima Khan, Rowan Williams and Richard Dawkins.

Exclusives:

Melvyn Bragg’s guest edit on 11 October 2010 featured “Last Letter”, a newly discovered, previously unpublished poem by Ted Hughes about the night that his wife Sylvia Plath committed suicide.

Jemima Khan’s guest edit (11 April 2011) featured her agenda-setting interview with the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg – in which he declared “I’m not a punchbag” – as well as Hugh Grant’s undercover interview with a former News of the World executive which became a worldwide media sensation.

Rowan Williams’s guest edit on 13 June 2011 dominated the news agenda for several days in response to his bold leader article criticising the coalition. He wrote, "We are being committed to radical, long-term policies for which no one voted.”

Richard Dawkins’s guest edit (19 December 2011) contained the last interview with the writer and polemicist Christopher Hitchens.

Artwork by Hvass & Hannibal @ Pocko

How Jim Murphy's mistake cost Labour - and helped make Ruth Davidson

Scottish Labour's former leader's great mistake was to run away from Labour's Scottish referendum, not on it.

The strange revival of Conservative Scotland? Another poll from north of the border, this time from the Times and YouGov, shows the Tories experiencing a revival in Scotland, up to 28 per cent of the vote, enough to net seven extra seats from the SNP.

Adding to the Nationalists’ misery, according to the same poll, they would lose East Dunbartonshire to the Liberal Democrats, reducing their strength in the Commons to a still-formidable 47 seats.

It could be worse than the polls suggest, however. In the elections to the Scottish Parliament last year, parties which backed a No vote in the referendum did better in the first-past-the-post seats than the polls would have suggested – thanks to tactical voting by No voters, who backed whichever party had the best chance of beating the SNP.

The strategic insight of Ruth Davidson, the Conservative leader in Scotland, was to to recast her party as the loudest defender of the Union between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom. She has absorbed large chunks of that vote from the Liberal Democrats and Labour, but, paradoxically, at the Holyrood elections at least, the “Unionist coalition” she assembled helped those parties even though it cost the vote share.

The big thing to watch is not just where the parties of the Union make gains, but where they successfully form strong second-places against whoever the strongest pro-Union party is.

Davidson’s popularity and eye for a good photo opportunity – which came first is an interesting question – mean that the natural benefactor in most places will likely be the Tories.

But it could have been very different. The first politician to hit successfully upon the “last defender of the Union” routine was Ian Murray, the last Labour MP in Scotland, who squeezed both the  Liberal Democrat and Conservative vote in his seat of Edinburgh South.

His then-leader in Scotland, Jim Murphy, had a different idea. He fought the election in 2015 to the SNP’s left, with the slogan of “Whether you’re Yes, or No, the Tories have got to go”.  There were a couple of problems with that approach, as one  former staffer put it: “Firstly, the SNP weren’t going to put the Tories in, and everyone knew it. Secondly, no-one but us wanted to move on [from the referendum]”.

Then again under different leadership, this time under Kezia Dugdale, Scottish Labour once again fought a campaign explicitly to the left of the SNP, promising to increase taxation to blunt cuts devolved from Westminster, and an agnostic position on the referendum. Dugdale said she’d be open to voting to leave the United Kingdom if Britain left the European Union. Senior Scottish Labour figures flirted with the idea that the party might be neutral in a forthcoming election. Once again, the party tried to move on – but no-one else wanted to move on.

How different things might be if instead of running away from their referendum campaign, Jim Murphy had run towards it in 2015. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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