David Miliband to guest-edit next week's New Statesman

Issue to focus on shifts in world power.

A special issue featuring essays, columns and interviews ­— with
Hillary Clinton, Kevin Rudd, Richard Branson, Michael Semple interview with Taliban leader, Tony Blair, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Russell Brand, Ed Miliband, David Walliams, Jonathan Coe, Jo Brand, Ozwald Boateng and many others

For this 80-page edition, David Miliband has commissioned a series of articles around the theme of shifts in world power.

David Miliband said:

“For many years I have wanted to tell New Statesman readers what really matters — so when Jason Cowley asked me to guest-edit an issue it was a challenge I couldn’t resist!

“This is an extraordinary time of economic and political change around the world that is immensely challenging for the west and for the left. So I have produced an issue that tries to explain the big drivers of change in the world, and how the west and the left should react.

“The issue reflects what I care about — from South Shields to human rights to what makes me smile or laugh. And I have tried to produce an issue that is passionate without shouting and uses reason without being technocratic.”

Jason Cowley, editor of the New Statesman, said:

“I asked David to guest-edit because we wanted to produce an issue exploring the great challenges facing the world in what is a period of profound and uneasy transition as power shifts from west to east and the old European social-democratic model becomes unsustainable. As a former foreign secretary and one of our most intellectually capable politicians, he was ideally placed to gather together leading thinkers and politicians in one issue of the New Statesman.

“Our guest-edited issues have proved hugely popular with our readers as well as being great journalistic successes. This one will be no different.”

The issue, cover-dated 16 July, will be on sale in London on Thursday 12 July and in the rest of the country from Friday 13 July. International buyers can obtain copies on our website at www.newstatesman.com.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

David Miliband is the New Statesman’s seventh guest editor, after Alastair Campbell, Ken Livingstone, Melvyn Bragg, Jemima Khan, Rowan Williams and Richard Dawkins.

Exclusives:

Melvyn Bragg’s guest edit on 11 October 2010 featured “Last Letter”, a newly discovered, previously unpublished poem by Ted Hughes about the night that his wife Sylvia Plath committed suicide.

Jemima Khan’s guest edit (11 April 2011) featured her agenda-setting interview with the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg – in which he declared “I’m not a punchbag” – as well as Hugh Grant’s undercover interview with a former News of the World executive which became a worldwide media sensation.

Rowan Williams’s guest edit on 13 June 2011 dominated the news agenda for several days in response to his bold leader article criticising the coalition. He wrote, "We are being committed to radical, long-term policies for which no one voted.”

Richard Dawkins’s guest edit (19 December 2011) contained the last interview with the writer and polemicist Christopher Hitchens.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.