Fact or Fiction: TwentyTwelve or 2012?

The Olympics are just one cock-up after the next. But are we in sitcom territory yet?

The path to the summer Olympics has been one of cock-up after cock-up. So much so that, just as Armando Iannucci must be finding it tricky to write the new series of The Thick of It, so the makers of TwentyTwelve, the BBC sitcom based around the many failings of the "Olympic Deliverence Agency", must be feeling rather prescient.

But are they? See if you can tell which of these are from 2012, and which are from TwentyTwelve:

1. A safe-sex ad campaign had to be dropped due to complaints from Catholic countries. 

2. The Olympic torch was blown out in Great Torrington.

3. George Galloway announced he was planning to perform a citizens arrest on a Middle-Eastern dictator.

4. The interfaith worship centre was moved to a different building in the park after someone realised it didn't face Mecca.

5. A busload full of dignitaries gets lost on the way to the olympic stadium.

6. A naked man with "Free Tibet" on his bottom interrupted the torch relay.

7. Protestors dumped a pile of horse manure outside the organisers' offices in protest at the closure of Greenwich park for equestrianism.

8. An executive was shot in the foot testing a faulty starter pistol.

9. The Olympic Torch was blown out in Greece.

10. The official £5 Olympic Coin is sold for £40.

11. Until special laws were passed, the pistols used in the shooting events were illegal in Britain.

12. At the same time as Seb Coe launched "Diversity Day", Boris Johnson launched "Inclusivity Day".

Highlight for answers:

1. TwentyTwelve 2. 2012 3. 2012 4. TwentyTwelve 5. Both 6. 2012 7. TwentyTwelve 8. TwentyTwelve 9. 2012 10. 2012 11. 2012 12. Twenty Twelve

A mess-up of Olympic proportions

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.