Second helpings
By Rachel Cooke - 16 January 12:00

The Fat Girl's Guide to Life

Wendy Shanker <em>Bloomsbury, 288pp, £8.99</em>

ISBN 0747578834

Analyse this
By Sebastian Harcombe - 16 January 12:00

Museums - Even now, Freud's couch has the power to bring buried memories to the surface, finds Sebas

Reducing inequalities in health
By Staff blogger - 21 November 12:00

A round-table discussion

Don't be daft
By Zoe Williams - 21 November 12:00

I Told You I Was Ill

John O'Connell <em>Short Books, 176pp, £9.99</em>

ISBN 1904977294

To catch a cold
By Brian Cathcart - 21 November 12:00

Observations on viruses

Put away those painkillers
By Margaret Cook - 21 November 12:00

Observations on viruses

Commissioning in the NHS
By Staff blogger - 14 November 12:00

Introduction

Michele Roberts enjoys a hearty meal in Smithfield
By Michele Roberts - 31 October 12:00

What better preparation for a heart op than a meal near an old meat market?

The poor pay the bill for the big fear
By Raj Persaud - 24 October 13:00

Observations on bird flu

Victims of a secret chemical war
By Sue Branford - 24 October 13:00

Observations on Colombia

Politicians on drugs - what's new?
By Simon MacDonald - 24 October 13:00

Observations on Tories

Victoria Hale
By Rabiya Tuma - 17 October 13:00

10 people - Her inspiring healthcare group brings cheap medicines to the world's poorest

Those mill owners knew a thing or two
By Raj Persaud - 17 October 13:00

Observations on work

The media column - Peter Wilby is immune to bird flu
By Peter Wilby - 17 October 13:00

After emerging from the Orient, bird flu was getting ever closer. By the time it reached Britain we

Call closing time on smoking
By Staff blogger - 17 October 13:00

What do these measures have in common? In 1875 the age of consent is raised from 12 to 13. In 1908 the sale of opium is restricted to people known to a pharmacist. In 1935 the first urban speed limit of 30 miles per hour is introduced.

I'm paid too much: a doctor writes
By Mark Jopling - 10 October 13:00

I am one of the least qualified, least skilled and lowliest paid doctors in my hospital. My days are spent searching for missing heaps of patient notes, running errands and chasing up blood test results. I am a "junior house officer", a useful but dispensable cog in a vast machine.

Risky Reform Syndrome: the NHS's life-threatening complaint
By Niall Dickson - 10 October 13:00

Streams of money are pouring into the National Health Service as a raft of changes kicks in, aiming

Hugo Chavez - showing the US who's master
By Gerri Peev - 10 October 13:00

Venezuela's president is rarely seen by foreigners for what he is: one of the world's most popular a

Don't let big boobs distract you
By Ellie Levenson - 10 October 13:00

Observations on breast cancer

Better and faster than politics
By Azeem Azhar - 26 September 13:00

Big business does much more to end global poverty than you might suppose

Notes from a maternity ward
By Angela Carter - 19 September 13:00

A <em>New Statesman</em> article from December 1983, by Angela Carter. Introduced by Kira Cochrane

Take this. You'll feel better
By Margaret Cook - 12 September 13:00

Observations on placebos

The dangers of cuddly extremism
By Ed Owen - 12 September 13:00

By their emotive rejection of all animal testing, the mainstream animal rights organisations are pro

What we don't know about drinking
By Barbara Gunnell - 29 August 13:00

Is there a connection between binge drinking, alcohol-related illness and the licensing hours? No on

The media column - Peter Wilby gives a science lesson
By Peter Wilby - 29 August 13:00

My advice to journalists is the same as that given to Woodward and Bernstein at the start of the Wat

Zoe Williams - Child's play
By Zoe Williams - 29 August 13:00

Television - Eight hapless dads-to-be allow themselves to be patronised. By Zoe Williams

He's H

There has to be a better way to go
By Michela Wrong - 22 August 13:00

The one thing we can be sure of is our own death. So why do we often make such a mess of it, asks M

NS Essay - 'The future of the human race depends on public spaces. They are the starting point for all community, commerce and democracy'
By Jay Walljasper - 15 August 13:00

People have withdrawn from the public realm in this era of rampant traffic and overblown security me

Civilisation goes down the pan
By Simon Busch - 08 August 13:00

Observations on the World Toilet Summit

Autism: the mercury trail
By Margaret Cook - 08 August 13:00

Powerful evidence points to a preservative in vaccines as the likely culprit

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