Vladimir Putin at the 2011 International Aviation and Space Show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow. Photo: Dmitry Kostyukov/AFP/Getty Images
Vladimir Putin has torn my family apart
By Jana Bakunina - 26 February 16:37

I grew up in a family of Soviet intelligentsia, but the relentless propaganda from Russia’s state-controlled media has convinced my father that I am not a patriot. I am a disappointment.

An Austrian chocolate torte. Very European. Photo: Alexander Klein/AFP/Getty Images
An EU explainer for the easily bored: where does the UK stand?
By Frances Robinson - 24 February 13:11

Frances Robinson continues her series on what we really need to know about the EU. This week: should the UK stay or should it go?

A man walks past a polling station in Dublin. Photo: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty
Why are fringe groups allowed the same air-time as LGBT activists in the run-up to Ireland’s marriage equality referendum?
By Paulie Doyle - 23 February 17:07

Under Irish broadcasting law, broadcasters cannot support marriage equality unopposed.

To ease Greece's burden would cost Europe little – and could prevent a eurozone collapse
By Vicky Pryce - 20 February 18:22

A refusal to acknowledge the democratic remit of the new, however irritating, Greek government could result in a contagion effect across the rest of the eurozone.

The Dominique Strauss-Kahn courtroom drama has put prostitution on trial
By Valeria Costa-Kostritsky - 20 February 11:48

The former IMF chief's pimping trial sees abolitionist views well-represented in the courtroom, but will sex workers be ignored?

People hold candles at a memorial in Copenhagen for those killed by the gunman. Photo: Asger Ladefoged/AFP/Getty
Leader: Europe and the new anti-Semitism
By New Statesman - 18 February 12:51

In recent months, there has been a series of fatal attacks by Islamist militants on Jewish people and institutions, as well as innumerable other instances of violence.

Inside the European Parliament in Strasbourg. Photo: Frederick Florin/AFP/GettyImages
An EU explainer for the easily bored: the institutions
By Frances Robinson - 17 February 12:00

In the first of a six-part series, Frances Robinson cuts through the election noise and tells you what you actually need to know about the bodies that make up the European Union.

Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt lays flowers outside the synagogue Krystalgade in Copenhagen. Photo: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty
Copenhagen shootings: PM says an attack on Jewish community is “an attack on all of Denmark”
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 16 February 12:08

Helle Thorning-Schmidt condemned the “cynical act of terror” against Denmark.

A Podemos rally in Madrid. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
Podemos goes pro: how the Spanish party are fine-tuning their election message
By Liam Aldous - 12 February 10:11

Much has changed since the protests of 2011. Now, last year's upstart party might just be in with a chance.

A branch of Paradise brothel in Spain. Photo: Getty
If you think decriminalisation will make prostitution safe, look at Germany's mega brothels
By Sarah Ditum - 05 February 16:19

The Liberal Democrats and Greens both support the decriminalisation of prostitution - in the hope of making it "safe". But Germany legalised it in 2002 and it still isn't "a job like any other". 

The party's leader, Pablo Iglesias. Photo: DANI POZO/AFP/Getty Images
Si, we can! How the left-wing Podemos party is rattling the Spanish establishment
By David Mathieson - 05 February 9:34

As the Spanish election approaches, a surge in support for the party has set the clock ticking.

Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Don’t let the ridiculous smears fool you: Syriza is no party of the radical “far left”
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 January 15:34

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

The new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis in Athens. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
As Greeks pin their hopes on change, Syriza must stand firm against the country’s elite
By Yiannis Baboulias - 28 January 10:47

Can new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, political economist and game theory academic, negotiate solutions to inequality?

Prisoners and US army soldiers stand behind the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp, which reads "Jedem das seine" (To each his just deserts).  Photo: Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty
Buchenwald in 1945: Richard Crossman tells the story of a holocaust survivor
By Richard Crossman - 27 January 8:58

In this article first published on 23 June 1945, the future Labour minister and New Statesman editor Richard Crossman recounts the experiences of “K”, a survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

Syriza supporters attending a rally in central Athens. Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images
Why the Greek election is so important
By Theo Papadopoulos - 23 January 10:48

If the pollsters are right, Syriza could win by a large margin, ending four decades of two-party rule in Greece.

The 11 January Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
France's Arab population is divided by an invisible wall
By Andrew Hussey - 22 January 11:42

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo shooting, we must address France's long war with its Arabs. Andrew Hussey reports from Paris.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Photo: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
Remembering Vladimir Putin as a boy
By Inna Lazareva - 15 January 9:18

Mina Moiseevna Yuditskaya, Putin's former German teacher, recounts her experiences with the most powerful man in Russia.

French police at the Jewish supermarket in Paris where several people were taken hostage.
Slavoj Žižek on the Charlie Hebdo massacre: Are the worst really full of passionate intensity?
By Slavoj Zizek - 10 January 21:31

How fragile the belief of an Islamist must be if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a weekly satirical newspaper, says the Slovenian philosopher.

French police officers stand guard outside Paris' main mosque as people enter for Friday prayers. Photo: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Is the Charlie Hebdo attack really a struggle over European values?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 09 January 13:07

By targeting the French magazine, the attackers were able to deepen already profound rifts in French society and establish an atmosphere ripe for the recruitment of alienated youths.

Charlie Hebdo is written near flowers and candles left at the Place de la Republique at midday in solidarity with victims of yesterday's terrorist attack on January 8, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo: Getty Images
Charlie Hebdo: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 08 January 18:20

Police in France are still tracking the three men responsible for killing 12 people yesterday at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Mass vigils are held around the world.

Ukranian forces on patrol near Sloviansk. Photo: Reuters/Gleb Garanich
Meet the ordinary Ukrainians arming the country against Russian separatists
By David Patrikarakos - 08 January 16:55

In Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists, civilians keep the army equipped.

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: A reckoning in the eurozone
By New Statesman - 08 January 16:31

Angela Merkel claims she no longer fears the "Grexit", but will the public be drawn to extreme means?

The offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. Photo: Getty Images
Murderous outrage in Paris as Charlie Hebdo, the magazine that mocked Mohammed, is attacked
By New Statesman - 07 January 11:46

Reports have 12 killed at Paris offices by men with automatic rifles.

Star factor: Marine has modernised the FN's image but remains a divisive figure even in her own party. Photo: Getty
At the gates of power: how Marine Le Pen is unnerving the French establishment
By Charles Bremner - 04 December 10:00

Under her father, the Front National was the pariah party of  France. Now Marine Le Pen has brought it closer to the mainstream – and people are getting worried. 

Kosovo Albanians walk past posters featuring Kosovan Prime Minister Hashim Thaci in Pristina, 4 June. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kosovo: disarray in the heart of the Balkans
By Melanie McDonagh - 27 November 10:00

The small nation state has not had a government for six months and corruption and cynicism still rule.

May’s European Parliament elections did nothing to prompt a response to the EU’s “democratic deficit”. Photo: Getty
I was a teenage Europhile – but the EU’s sadistic austerity and lack of democracy changed my mind
By Mehdi Hasan - 20 November 11:15

Fast-forward 15-odd years and my wild-eyed teenage Europhilia is a source of much embarrassment.

Breaking up: Pro-independence activists after a symbolic vote on independence for Catalonia from Spain at a polling station in Barcelona on 9 November. Photo: Getty
Letter from Barcelona: Inside the battle for Catalan independence
By Jamie Maxwell - 20 November 10:00

This crisis could have been avoided. In recent years, Madrid has run a masterclass in how not to handle breakaway nationalism.

Pride, honour, poverty, patriotism: pro-Putin protesters parade through Moscow as he becomes president for the second time, May 2012. Photo: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin
Putin is not Russia: the Kremlin’s view on events in Ukraine
By Robert Skidelsky - 20 November 10:00

War in Ukraine, economic woes and the decline of an autocrat, by Robert Skidelsky.

Remembering: People gather to look the illumination on Boesebruecke bridge, where 25 years before thousands of East Germans first crossed into West Berlin. Photo: Getty
John Simpson: the raising of the Iron Curtain felt like a miracle
By John Simpson - 18 November 10:00

It all happened because of the use of a single German word, unverzüglich: “immediately”, or “at once”.

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