Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Don’t let the ridiculous smears fool you: Syriza is no party of the radical “far left”
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 January 15:34

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

The new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis in Athens. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
As Greeks pin their hopes on change, Syriza must stand firm against the country’s elite
By Yiannis Baboulias - 28 January 10:47

Can new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, political economist and game theory academic, negotiate solutions to inequality?

Prisoners and US army soldiers stand behind the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp, which reads "Jedem das seine" (To each his just deserts).  Photo: Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty
Buchenwald in 1945: Richard Crossman tells the story of a holocaust survivor
By Richard Crossman - 27 January 8:58

In this article first published on 23 June 1945, the future Labour minister and New Statesman editor Richard Crossman recounts the experiences of “K”, a survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

Syriza supporters attending a rally in central Athens. Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images
Why the Greek election is so important
By Theo Papadopoulos - 23 January 10:48

If the pollsters are right, Syriza could win by a large margin, ending four decades of two-party rule in Greece.

The 11 January Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
France's Arab population is divided by an invisible wall
By Andrew Hussey - 22 January 11:42

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo shooting, we must address France's long war with its Arabs. Andrew Hussey reports from Paris.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Photo: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
Remembering Vladimir Putin as a boy
By Inna Lazareva - 15 January 9:18

Mina Moiseevna Yuditskaya, Putin's former German teacher, recounts her experiences with the most powerful man in Russia.

French police at the Jewish supermarket in Paris where several people were taken hostage.
Slavoj Žižek on the Charlie Hebdo massacre: Are the worst really full of passionate intensity?
By Slavoj Zizek - 10 January 21:31

How fragile the belief of an Islamist must be if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a weekly satirical newspaper, says the Slovenian philosopher.

French police officers stand guard outside Paris' main mosque as people enter for Friday prayers. Photo: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Is the Charlie Hebdo attack really a struggle over European values?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 09 January 13:07

By targeting the French magazine, the attackers were able to deepen already profound rifts in French society and establish an atmosphere ripe for the recruitment of alienated youths.

Charlie Hebdo is written near flowers and candles left at the Place de la Republique at midday in solidarity with victims of yesterday's terrorist attack on January 8, 2015 in Paris, France. Photo: Getty Images
Charlie Hebdo: what we know so far
By New Statesman - 08 January 18:20

Police in France are still tracking the three men responsible for killing 12 people yesterday at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Mass vigils are held around the world.

Ukranian forces on patrol near Sloviansk. Photo: Reuters/Gleb Garanich
Meet the ordinary Ukrainians arming the country against Russian separatists
By David Patrikarakos - 08 January 16:55

In Ukraine’s battle against Russian-backed separatists, civilians keep the army equipped.

Photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Leader: A reckoning in the eurozone
By New Statesman - 08 January 16:31

Angela Merkel claims she no longer fears the "Grexit", but will the public be drawn to extreme means?

The offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. Photo: Getty Images
Murderous outrage in Paris as Charlie Hebdo, the magazine that mocked Mohammed, is attacked
By New Statesman - 07 January 11:46

Reports have 12 killed at Paris offices by men with automatic rifles.

Star factor: Marine has modernised the FN's image but remains a divisive figure even in her own party. Photo: Getty
At the gates of power: how Marine Le Pen is unnerving the French establishment
By Charles Bremner - 04 December 10:00

Under her father, the Front National was the pariah party of  France. Now Marine Le Pen has brought it closer to the mainstream – and people are getting worried. 

Kosovo Albanians walk past posters featuring Kosovan Prime Minister Hashim Thaci in Pristina, 4 June. Photo: Getty
Letter from Kosovo: disarray in the heart of the Balkans
By Melanie McDonagh - 27 November 10:00

The small nation state has not had a government for six months and corruption and cynicism still rule.

May’s European Parliament elections did nothing to prompt a response to the EU’s “democratic deficit”. Photo: Getty
I was a teenage Europhile – but the EU’s sadistic austerity and lack of democracy changed my mind
By Mehdi Hasan - 20 November 11:15

Fast-forward 15-odd years and my wild-eyed teenage Europhilia is a source of much embarrassment.

Breaking up: Pro-independence activists after a symbolic vote on independence for Catalonia from Spain at a polling station in Barcelona on 9 November. Photo: Getty
Letter from Barcelona: Inside the battle for Catalan independence
By Jamie Maxwell - 20 November 10:00

This crisis could have been avoided. In recent years, Madrid has run a masterclass in how not to handle breakaway nationalism.

Pride, honour, poverty, patriotism: pro-Putin protesters parade through Moscow as he becomes president for the second time, May 2012. Photo: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin
Putin is not Russia: the Kremlin’s view on events in Ukraine
By Robert Skidelsky - 20 November 10:00

War in Ukraine, economic woes and the decline of an autocrat, by Robert Skidelsky.

Remembering: People gather to look the illumination on Boesebruecke bridge, where 25 years before thousands of East Germans first crossed into West Berlin. Photo: Getty
John Simpson: the raising of the Iron Curtain felt like a miracle
By John Simpson - 18 November 10:00

It all happened because of the use of a single German word, unverzüglich: “immediately”, or “at once”.

Berlin breach: the fall of the wall on 9 November 1989 changed the Soviet Union almost as much as Germany. Photo: Chute du Mur Berline/Gamma-Rapho/Getty
Why the fall of the Berlin Wall was a disaster for the right
By Simon Heffer - 08 November 9:00

To those on the right, the end of the Iron Curtain 25 years ago was a moral and ideological victory – but they have found some of the consequences dismaying.

Detail of David Wilkie's The Chelsea Pensioners Reading the Waterloo Dispatch (1822). Image: Apsley House/The Wellington Museum/Bridgeman Images
What the Battle of Waterloo teaches us about Europe today
By Brendan Simms - 30 October 9:00

The centenary of the start of the First World War has reopened old wounds. Yet Germany and Britain once enjoyed a special relationship – as when they defeated Napoleon at Waterloo – and they could do so again

A refugee looks at the sea from Lampedusa Island in the Mediterranean. Photo: Getty
A year of Mare Nostrum: political impotence has stranded hundreds of refugee children in Sicily
By Jamie Mackay - 03 October 10:34

Since April this year 5,000 unaccompanied children have arrived in the small Sicilian town of Augusta, fleeing war and poverty in north Africa.

Neil MacGregor. Photo: BBC
Is this the perfect radio series? On Germany: Memories of a Nation
By Antonia Quirke - 02 October 8:59

Following on from the global success of A History of the World in 100 Objects, Neil MacGregor is back with a new 30-part series.

New recruits: Ukrainian soldiers take a break during training near Yavorov, 16 September. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: It is sobering to see how war has taken hold in Ukraine
By Lindsey Hilsum - 18 September 10:00

There is no question in my mind that Russia stirred up this war to destabilise Ukraine, but how will these people ever trust the government in Kyiv again?

Nuns cleaning their church for Easter in Caltanissetta, Sicily. Photo: Getty
A holy mess: the ongoing sacred soap opera of Radio Maria in Sicily
By Antonia Quirke - 18 September 9:20

In southern Sicily you often hear Maria in the background in shops, like an ongoing soap opera: the live Mass from Medjugorje, where there have been apparitions of the Madonna since 1981, or the replaying of news from Radio Vaticana.

A woman pushes her bicycle past a non-exploded rocket in Ilovaisk, 50km southeast of Donetsk, 4 September. Photo: Getty
When one mistake can lead to catastrophe: what next for Ukraine?
By David Patrikarakos - 04 September 16:56

A ceasefire has been agreed but it remains in doubt whether Russia plans to conquer eastern Ukraine or establish a quasi-autonomous state there. 

French President François Hollande. Photo: Getty
Where has the French Left gone?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 03 September 12:09

The recent dissolution of the government reflects the increasing pressure on Hollande to turn around a dire economic outlook.

Putin is in international disgrace - the west must make him feel it
Any financial loss to Britain mustn’t obscure the aim of sanctions on Russia
By Robert Macquarie - 04 August 13:19

The cost of recent economic sanctions will be felt in the west, but it’s a cost we can – and should – withstand. 

Cameron's crackdown on migrant benefits is too little, too late to help him
By Lucy Fisher - 31 July 16:38

Has the government's series of changes to European rules been too slow, and too limited, to convince the public that Britain should remain in the EU?

An armed separatist guards in front of wagons containing the remains of victims from the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, at a railway station in the eastern Ukrainian town of Torez on July 21, 2014. Photo: Getty
If you lived in Russia, this is what you’d believe about the crash of MH17
By Julia Ioffe - 21 July 15:47

The Kremlin’s propaganda pushing support for the separatists in eastern Ukraine has been so effective that the Russian people have a completely different understanding of the downing of MH17 – and even Putin may be unable to hold back the jingoism.

Pages