Jesús Muñoz, flat in the LA River bed, features in James Ellroy's LAPD '53. Photo: © 2015 LOS ANGELES POLICE MUSEUM
Ghettoside is a bold, humane study of Los Angeles’ black homicide epidemic
By Ryan Gattis - 21 May 11:18

Ryan Gattis reviews two books on the Los Angeles police – and finds a city plagued by a national problem.

Protesters in Burundi hitch a ride on a police vehicle. Photo: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images
In today’s Burundi, neutrality is the best way to survive
By Jessica Hatcher - 20 May 15:15

The government’s divide-and-rule strategy seems to be working and there are rumours the police have drawn up a “kill list”.

A yes campaign poster in Dublin. Photo: Getty
Will Ireland make history and vote for same sex marriage?
By Aoife Moriarty - 20 May 11:23

This referendum has brought a clear dichotomy in Irish society into sharp focus: the divide between traditional Catholicism and a more progressive, global outlook.

Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper. Photo: Ben Stansall - WPA Pool /Getty Images
How Stephen Harper is using paranoia to win in 2015
By Noah Richler - 18 May 9:23

From Islam to oil sands critics, Harper is using a fear of outsiders to unite voters.

Victory Day in Russia: why use a huge military display to commemorate peace?
By Jana Bakunina - 11 May 18:02

Cutting through the patriotism in Russia's Victory Day march.

Rip it up and start again: a kindergarten remains standing on a demolition site in Shaanxi Province. Photo: Reuters
Disappearing villages: the losers in China's breakneck urbanisation
By Isabel Hilton - 06 May 10:33

So rapid has China's development been that at any given moment there are vast, empty proto-cities waiting for people.

Mount Everest. Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Jan Morris: No one else needs to climb Everest – let’s turn it into a memorial
By Jan Morris - 06 May 8:32

Everest has been violated by fame, profit, sectarian rivalry and national pride. It's time to return it to holiness.

Women protesting in Cairo after the death of Shaimaa al-Sabbagh. Photo: Mohamed el-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images
In Egypt, the left is struggling against apathy and fear
By Ruth Michaelson - 05 May 9:52

The death of Shaimaa al-Sabbagh sent shockwaves through Egypt’s left. Now, with elections postponed again, the movement is at an impasse.

A Buddha statue is surrounded by debris from a collapsed temple. Photo: Omar Havana/Getty Images
Nepal has become a country that can't see the future – this quake gives us a chance to change that
By Rubeena Mahato - 30 April 12:17

I look at my house, damaged when a neighbour’s house collapsed on to it, and I wonder: will any of this be rebuilt?

A crowd of supporters hold up “Je Suis Charlie” signs. Photo: Franck Pennant/AFP/Getty Images
If you don’t speak French, how can you judge if Charlie Hebdo is racist?
By Robert McLiam Wilson - 29 April 9:16

Prominent writers have chosen to boycott a PEN gala in honour of Charlie Hebdo. But are they in any position to pass judgement?

Alaa al-Aswany in Paris, February 2014. Photo: JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
You can't betray the revolution: why Egyptian activist Alaa al-Aswany likes being a dentist
By Sophie McBain - 29 April 8:00

“A revolution is basically a human change, not a political one,” he says. “People are no longer the Egyptians they were under Mubarak.”

A Nepalese resident sits near collapsed and damaged buildings on Sunday. Photo: Getty
Kathmandu mourns earthquake's victims and continues search for survivors
By Citymetric - 28 April 12:53

It is now estimated that the death toll could reach ten thousand.

Men stare at the smoldering remains of a senior center set ablaze in Baltimore, Maryland. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty
Six Baltimore police officers have been charged over the death of Freddie Gray
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 28 April 12:44

Violence, looting, and several fires followed Freddie Gray's funeral, the 25-year-old African-American man who died after being illegally arrested.

Brie, a French gastronomic specialty. Photo: Cate Gillon/Getty Images
French-bashing, my phantom chat with Nicola Sturgeon... and remembering Gallipoli
By Sylvie Bermann - 28 April 9:36

French ambassador Sylvia Bermann gives the final word on Sturgeon's alleged support of the Tories.

The Armenian genocide memorial in Armenia. Photo: Flickr/z@doune
The Armenian genocide: the journey from victim to survivor
By Anoosh Chakelian - 24 April 9:59

The global activity around the Armenian genocide centenary is unprecedented – reality TV stars, western lawyers, Turkish intellectuals, metalheads and the Pope have all spoken out. But has this brought international recognition any closer?

A shipwrecked migrant and child on arrival in Greece. Photo: Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty
Mare Nostrum and the high price of guarding “our sea”
By Daniel Trilling - 23 April 12:18

It seems that the British government views migrant deaths as a useful deterrent, but criminal activity remains unaffected by the decision to let desperate migrants drown.

Islamic State faces a complex web of militant groups and violence in Pakistan
By Samira Shackle - 23 April 10:14

The signs of Islamic State moving into Pakistan are there, but what difference does this make in a nation already subject to similar horrors?

A woman at work in the Who Made Your Pants workshop. Photo: WMYP
Why don’t you care who made your clothes?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 22 April 15:53

Two years after the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh, in which over a thousand people died, we still fail to appreciate the human cost of the clothes we wear.

The comeback kid. Photo:Getty
Why the Tories still have a spring in their step
By Stephen Bush - 22 April 12:57

Senior Conservatives are drawing comfort from Binyamin Netanyhu's late comeback in the Israeli elections.

A wreath floats off the coastline of Lampedusa after a boat sank there in 2013. Photo: Getty
What Katie Hopkins wrote was monstrous. But save your anger for the politicians who decided to let migrants drown
By Sarah Ditum - 20 April 9:29

It's nice to condemn the usefully loathsome Hopkins, but what she has said is merely a frank statement of the politics our government has been enacting at our borders in our name for years now.

System of a Down's Serj Tankian on his tour for recognition of the Armenian genocide
By Anoosh Chakelian - 17 April 15:10

The Armenian-American metal band, System of a Down, is doing a special tour for the Armenian genocide centenary. We catch up with the lead singer to find out why.

From Cecil Rhodes to Mahatma Gandhi: why is South Africa tearing its statues down?
By Martin Plaut - 16 April 17:20

Removing symbols of the past is an ineffective form of protest.

"The memory of the world": British attempts to save endangered Middle Eastern artefacts
By Tom Overton - 16 April 15:05

Rescuing and preserving Middle Eastern texts and artefacts in the "post-custodial" age.

Hillary Clinton at the world bank. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Can anyone stop the Clinton machine? Only time will tell
By Sasha Abramsky - 16 April 14:09

Coronations seldom proceed as planned in the drawn-out US primary season - the polish can't hold long without cracking somewhere.

Perestroika is turning 30 – so why aren't Russians celebrating?
By Jana Bakunina - 16 April 8:42

I was six when perestroika was introduced, and I remember the benefits. So why aren't Russians looking back fondly to Gorbachev's reforms?

Talking with terrorists is a dangerous business – but sometimes, it's the only way
By Richard Howitt - 09 April 15:38

In Colombia, the government and FARC are taking the first steps to a lasting peace.

Marine Le Pen. Photo: Getty
Marine Le Pen repudiates her (racist) dad Jean-Marie, calling his strategy political suicide
By Stephanie Boland - 08 April 15:53

Marine Le Pen has declared that her father Jean-Marie can no longer "hold the party hostage" following his recent remarks on the Holocaust.

John Oliver gets to the crux of why the Snowden leaks matter: mass surveillance of dick pics
By Ian Steadman - 07 April 12:59

"I guess I never thought about putting it in the context of your junk."

Illustration: John Thys/AFP/Getty
The mystery president: How the Charlie Hebdo shooting saved François Hollande's reputation
By Charles Bremner - 07 April 7:52

François Hollande was elected on a promise to rule from the left, but proved an unpopular figure – until the January attack on Charlie Hebdo offered an unexpected reprieve.

Roses from the funeral of a mafia victim. Photo: Getty
The pursuit of power: Why Isis loves spreadsheets and mafia bosses build chapels
By Ian Leslie - 02 April 14:55

We tend to think of terrorists and gangsters - the professionally violent – as opponents of the state. In fact, they are alternatives to it. Like politicians, gangsters and terrorists are interested in governance.

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