Sightless witness: British troops blinded by mustard gas in the German spring offensive. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty
Simon Heffer: First World War, the battle of the historians
By Simon Heffer - 03 July 10:00

From almost the opening shot, the Great War has been fought over by historians wishing to interpret and understand what happened and why. Their conflict is not over yet.

Spy on the wall: a painting of GCHQ displayed in the Mount Street Gallery, London in 2011. Photo: Getty
Laurie Penny on terror and surveillance: Oh look! There's a new bogeyman on the scene to justify online spying
By Laurie Penny - 03 July 10:00

Liam Fox insists that the “public will accept” increased surveillance because of the threat of terrorism. One suspects that if we don’t accept it, we’ll be made to.

Life goes on, for now: the famous Shahbandar café in Baghdad, 27 June. Photo: Getty
Lindsey Hilsum: “Apprehension and excitement at being back in Iraq is eclipsed by fury”
By Lindsey Hilsum - 03 July 10:00

Channel 4 News’s international editor returns to a country where she has strong memories and friendships but finds her movements hampered by customs officials. 

Algeria fans supporting their team in Marseilles. Photo: Getty
New attacks on French-Algerian citizens resurrect old, subtle forms of racism
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 02 July 16:56

The World Cup is just the latest political football to be kicked by the Front National’s Marine Le Pen, who suggested that “You are either French or Algerian”.

The Supreme Court in Washington DC. Photo: Getty
The Hobby Lobby decision was a victory for women’s rights
By Andrew Koppelman - 01 July 14:32

The Supreme Court has found a solution that is good for women and good for religious liberty.

Refuge: Kurdish women in Erbil feed Iraqi Christians fleeing violence in their villages. Photo: Getty
Fergal Keane: “Erbil is a haven. If you wanted a happier dream of Iraq, this is the place to visit”
By Fergal Keane - 01 July 11:00

The BBC correspondent travels to Iraq for the first time since 2003 to find quiet, fearful streets in Jalula but tranquility and tolerance in Iraq’s Kurdish capital. 

Justin Bieber: big in Manila. Photo: Getty.
The authorities keep trying to ban celebrities from Manila
By Barbara Speed - 30 June 15:53

Why is the Filipino capital so sensitive?

Adokiye in a promo shoot. Photo: daXclusive/adokiye.com
Nigerian popstar Adokiye offers Boko Haram her virginity for kidnapped schoolgirls' release
By Daisy Lafarge - 27 June 17:06

A rising star in Nigeria, frustrated at the fading news coverage of Boko Haram's abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls, has offered up her virginity.

Four tips David Cameron can learn from world leaders on how to use Twitter
By Sophie McBain - 26 June 12:24

What tips can David Cameron learn from the annual Twiplomacy report, which studies how world leaders use Twitter? He needs a little help – not only because he's regularly insulted online, but because Barack Obama won't follow him back. 

Iraqi Kurdish soldiers prepare to fight Isis militants 20km south of Kirkuk, 23 June. Photo: Getty
In the Kurds’ make-do capital, Erbil, the message is clear: Iraq needs a three-state solution
By Jonathan Rugman - 26 June 10:00

Accompanied by a small army of peshmerga, I went as close as I dared to the front line, an army base in Kirkuk that the Iraqis had abandoned without putting up much of a fight.

Europe is not just another geopolitical power block. Photo: Getty
Slavoj Žižek: Only a radicalised left can save Europe
By Slavoj Zizek - 25 June 16:32

Austerity is not “too radical”, as some leftist critics claim, but, on the contrary, too superficial, an act of avoiding the true roots of the crisis, says Slavoj Žižek.

Iraqi Turkmen preparing to fight Isis militants last weekend
Isis and the global rise of non-state actors
By Lucy Fisher - 23 June 13:48

The recent onslaught by Isis isn't a rogue success for terrorist groups; non-state actors are on the rise worldwide. We should be watching and wary.

Shakir Waheib, a senior member of Isis, stands next to a burning police car in Anbar Province, Iraq
Blowback: who are Isis and why are young Brits fighting with them?
By John Bew and Shiraz Maher - 23 June 11:54

Hundreds of young British men are said to have joined the murderous group, first in Syria and now on its bloody incursion into Iraq. What happens when they come home?

Clinton voted for military action in Iraq but now admits she got it wrong. Photo: Bloomberg via Getty
The new stateswoman: Hillary Clinton’s steely idealism
By Douglas Alexander - 23 June 10:34

Will Hillary run for president in 2016? Her memoir is more interested in the fine art of diplomacy.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Getty
The Sudanese dictatorship: twenty-five years of impunity
By Martin Plaut - 20 June 12:50

Once, the plight of Darfur’s two million refugees would have made front page news. Today they seldom make even a paragraph in the inside pages of British broadsheets, although the repression continues unabated.

The beach in Mombasa, Kenya. Photo: Getty
In Kenya, al-Shabab is using terror as a way of destroying the economy
By Samira Shackle - 20 June 11:12

The group’s long-term strategy is to destroy Kenya’s reputation as a safe tourist destination, damaging its economy and weakening its ability to successfully fight terrorism in Somalia.

Iraqi soldiers. Photo: Getty
The answer to Iraq’s current crisis is not the left re-fighting the arguments of 2003
By Dorian Lynskey - 19 June 12:01

As soon as Iraq plunges into another disaster, the 2003 reenactment society gets back together, presenting a simple case of cause and effect  but the ISIS insurgency wasn’t inevitable.

Smile! Despite being booed, the World Cup has gone well for Dilma Rousseff so far. Photo: Getty
Dilma Rousseff was booed but the riots haven’t started – and most people are enjoying the football
By Jonathan Wilson - 19 June 11:43

 A successful World Cup could create a mood of general contentment that might yet carry Rousseff to an election victory later this year.

A volunteer member of the Iraqi security service in the Shiite Muslim shrine city of Najaf. Photo: Getty
Leader: The solution to the Isis uprising must come from the Middle East
By New Statesman - 19 June 11:25

A lasting settlement cannot be imposed from the outside.

Gung-ho: a boy brandishes a gun from a van taking volunteers to join the fight against jihadists in the north. Photograph: Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images
Could Isis take Iraq’s capital?
By Hayder al-Khoei - 19 June 11:07

Despite the media’s focus on the sectarian dimension of Iraq’s current crisis, the reality is more complex.

Madeleine Rees. Photo: Yasmine Akim
"Let's replace the word gender for power": Madeleine Rees on sexual violence in conflict
By Anoosh Chakelian - 19 June 11:02

The former UN human rights lawyer, and one of the Foreign Secretary's advisers on ending sexual violence in conflict, on how everyday sexism and rape in warfare are on the same continuum.

Mad or bad? Ex-PM Tony Blair in Hong Kong, 2012. Photo: Getty
Blair’s supporters should stage a humanitarian intervention – and make him shut up about Iraq
By Mehdi Hasan - 18 June 17:02

How many Sure Start centres cancel out the depleted uranium used in Fallujah? Why does record investment in the NHS absolve the torture and abuse in Abu Ghraib?

Isis's strangely corporate approach to terror makes them all the more scary
By Sophie McBain - 18 June 15:14

From its unsettling but bureaucratic annual reports to its sophisticated social media strategy, the jihadist group Isis has been borrowing ideas from business and applying them to international terror. 

A kitten and a gun, as posted on Instagram by a jihadi fighter with the hashtag #CatsOfJihad.
Why terrorists tweet about cats
By Ian Steadman - 18 June 13:09

It used to be that extremists used Facebook and YouTube to post recruiting videos - but Isis and its fighters have become adept at using social media to show their side of war.

Iraqi Shiite tribesmen in the south who have volunteered to fight. Photo: Getty
What is going to happen in Iraq?
By Isaac Chotiner - 17 June 13:08

It is not the assertiveness of new entities that is driving change, but the collapse of the old national constructions.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

Displaced Iraqi women arrive at a temporary camp in Aski Kalak in the north of the country. Photo: Getty
With Iraq, Obama was dealt a bad hand – and he’s playing it badly
By Jessica Schulberg - 16 June 12:57

The latest violence exposes the administration’s lack of vision for the broader Middle East.

Senator Elizabeth Warren in late 2013. Photo: Getty
Why Elizabeth Warren should take on Hillary Clinton and run for the US presidency
By Mehdi Hasan - 16 June 11:13

Simply by running, Warren will drag the centrist Clinton to the left and put the causes she cares about – financial reform, fairer taxes, income inequality – at the centre of the 2016 presidential election.

New face of justice: along with many black South Africans, Pumla Godobo-Madikizela thinks Eugene de Kock should be freed. Photo: Bloomberg
Should the apartheid regime’s “Prime Evil” be released?
By Eric Abraham - 13 June 12:33

Ten years ago psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela wrote a book about the encounters she had with Eugene de Kock, head of apartheid South Africa’s death squad, when in Pretoria prison. She thinks he should be pardoned. 

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