Harvard to high office: Senator Elizabeth Warren, who heads the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Photo: Getty
Encounters in a Harvard canteen, Elizabeth Warren’s options and the charm of John McCain
By Douglas Alexander - 01 May 15:28

The shadow foreign secretary reports from a four-day trip to the States. 

World Bank Vice President for the Africa Region Obiageli Ezekwesili delivers a speech. Photo: Getty
Why is there such a culture of misinformation surrounding the case of Nigeria’s kidnapped girls?
By Emma Dabiri - 01 May 14:54

The tragedy of the two hundred girls kidnapped in Nigeria won’t be as high-profile a story as individual western kidnap victims – and the Nigerian authorities aren’t helping.

Everything you need to know about India’s elections
By Sophie McBain - 01 May 12:50

On 16 May we'll know the results of the world’s biggest-ever elections – with 814m Indians voting over six weeks. What’s at stake?

A priest blesses cakes and painted eggs for Orthodox Easter in the village of Semurovtsy, Belarus, 19 April. Photo: Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images
Belarus is now at risk of losing its independence to Russia
By Charles Grant - 30 April 10:00

Most Belarusians have a somewhat weaker sense of identity than Ukrainians but they feel Belarusian rather than Russian.

No way home: Syrian refugees sleeping outside the Centre for Temporary Stay of Immigrants (CETI), in Melilla, Spain, 2 April. Photo: Getty
“My heart aches for Syria. I don’t think people think about that”
By Samira Shackle - 29 April 9:40

While 2.6 million Syrians have fled the country, few have so far come to Britain. Yet the current anti-immigration climate ignores the desperate circumstances of those forced here.

Abuse of women domestic workers in Qatar exposes uncomfortable truths closer to home
By Sophie McBain - 23 April 13:42

A new report from Amnesty International describes how domestic workers in Qatar face abuse and exploitation. The problem isn't just limited to Qatar, however: domestic workers in the UK are similarly vulnerable.

The chained fist of the statue celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the US. Photo: Getty
Much of Britain's wealth is built on slavery. So why shouldn't it pay reparations?
By Priyamvada Gopal - 23 April 10:09

The benefits of slavery have accrued down the generations, so why are we so nervous about the responsibility for the slave trade doing the same?

Venice seen from the air. Photo: Getty
All is not what it seems with Venice’s separatist vote
By Anna Cento Bull - 22 April 11:20

A flash in the pan, or the start of something big?

Ukrainian extremists will only triumph if Russia invades
By Timothy Snyder - 17 April 15:51

Ukraine has no future without Europe, but Europe also has no future without Ukraine.

Oscar Pistorius in court. Photo: Getty
After Pistorius, South African media won't be the same again
By Anton Harber - 17 April 11:15

With cameras in court, new 24/7 news channels and no-holds-barred commentary on social media, the trial of Oscar Pistorius has shaken up the South African media.

James the evangelist: Jimmy Carter at home in Plains, Georgia
Jimmy Carter: “William Hague is a hero of mine”
By John Bew - 17 April 10:00

Our man in Washington John Bew has coffee with the former US president – and they talk Thatcher, Iran’s Islamic Revolution and the persecution of women.

Truth to power: Arvind Kejriwal campaigning in Delhi in early April. Photo: Hindustan Times via Getty
Taxman with the common touch: Arvind Kejriwal of India’s Aam Aadmi Party
By Priya Virmani - 17 April 10:00

The AAP’s leader looks like a cross between Gandhi and Charlie Chaplin and has an unwavering, energetic commitment to his cause.

A pro-Russian activist holds an icon in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, 9 April. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, the protesters wait for Russia to take charge
By David Patrikarakos - 17 April 10:00

Standing in front of the barricades, two pensioners held up a banner with “For ever with Russia” emblazoned across it. The sentiment was uniform and unambiguous.

India’s Supreme Court recognises a third gender
By Sophie McBain - 16 April 11:37

The Supreme Court in India has issued a new law allowing transgender people to change their gender on official documents to reflect their gender identity – why are so many European countries still several steps behind?

Hungary’s cold war with polio
By Penny Bailey - 15 April 10:17

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

Young women in Somalia take part in a discussion on FGM, February 2014. Photo: Getty
Zero-tolerance on FGM doesn’t have to be an attack on multiculturalism
By Reema Patel - 11 April 16:45

The problem is that many feel they have to pick a side. But we know that cultures are not as fixed and unchanging as powerful advocates within them may like to make out.

Glimmer of hope: women queue to vote in the recent Afghan elections
Leader: the lessons of the Afghanistan misadventure have not been learned
By New Statesman - 11 April 12:00

It was by accident, not by design, that the UK avoided being drawn into the sectarian vortex of Syria.

Financing the favelas: a shanty town in São Paulo. Photo: Getty
Start-up finance and the Brazilian favelas
By Claire Rigby - 10 April 17:39

The country has embraced e-commerce since a series of tax reforms in the Noughties, despite stifling bureaucracy.

South Australian outback. There is very poor network coverage in much of the country. Photo: Getty
Australia’s grand vision for a national broadband network has shrunk
By Mary Hamilton - 10 April 16:27

Big coastal cities do not always get good coverage, let alone the outback.

Photo: Susannah Ireland/Eyevine
Leaving Afghanistan: is it finally time to be positive about this blighted nation?
By William Dalrymple - 10 April 10:13

The Afghan presidential election has been declared a success – but as the west finalises its pull-out, what the country's prospects?

Asma Assad comforts Syrian women in a photo from the offical Instagram account
In Syria, the internet has become just another battleground
By Sophie McBain - 10 April 10:00

President Assad’s Instagram account is one of the more surreal examples of the use of social networking in the Syrian war.

Pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the Ukrainian regional Security Service building in Donetsk. Photo: Getty
In eastern Ukraine, protestors are chanting “New Russia” – an old term that’s back in fashion
By Linda Kinstler - 08 April 9:22

Separatists in Donetsk and elsewhere are harking back to the 18th century territory of Novorossiya, as Moscow seems to be making moves to federalise Ukraine.

The party should start talking about responsible capitalism in a global context.
Labour needs to turn up the volume on international development
By Richard Darlington - 07 April 16:31

Why is Labour not yet talking about responsible capitalism in a global context?

UN general secretary Ban Ki-Moon, Rwanda's president Paul Kagame and others await the lighting of a flame that will burn in memory of those who died in 1994. Photo: Getty
If a genocide on the scale of Rwanda happened in Europe, would we stand idly by?
By Musa Okwonga - 07 April 12:19

Twenty years after the genocide, Rwandans are finding ways to reconciliation. But it’s too soon for the nations and institutions that failed to help to forgive themselves.

The facts of killing: how do we write about the Rwandan Genocide?
By Giles Foden - 07 April 8:48

Twenty years on, we still struggle to comprehend the trauma.

Erdogan addresses a crowd of supporters from the balcony of the AKP Party HQ in Ankara, 31 March. (Photo: Getty)
Turkey: Erdogan’s dirty war of attrition
By Alev Scott - 03 April 14:53

As Turkey goes to the polls, the televised speeches from rallies are far from polite.

Wendy Davis during her 13-hour filibuster of an anti-abortion bill in the Texas state senate. Photo: Getty
Can Wendy Davis become the first Democratic governor of Texas in 20 years?
By Nicky Woolf - 03 April 14:48

Wendy Davis shot to fame in 2012 after her 13-hour filibuster to stop a particularly vicious anti-abortion bill. But can she convert that kind of recognition into victory in the race to be governor of Texas?

Franz Alekseyevich Roubaud's panoramic painting The Siege of Sevastopol (1854-55) shows the Charge of the Light Brigade. (Image: Bridgeman Art Library)
Defend the west: is it time to re-arm?
By Brendan Simms - 03 April 11:00

Europe should not underestimate the Russian threat, argues historian and professor of international relations Brendan Simms. We must show how seriously we take Putin’s assault on Ukraine by working towards unification and moral and military rearmament.

Nigel Farage and Nick Clegg during first of the two debates on Europe. Photo: Getty
Why does Nigel Farage want us to follow the lead of countries that are smaller than Bristol?
By Mehdi Hasan - 03 April 9:17

Eurosceptics harp on about the need for democracy. But the Swiss, like the Norwegians and the Icelanders, choose to eat food from a table at which they have no seat.

New-found confidence: Vladimir Putin at the Sochi Paralympics closing ceremony last month. (Photo: Getty)
Letter from Moscow: the mood turns nasty
By Angus Roxburgh - 01 April 14:01

In the wake of the Ukraine crisis a rampant chauvinism has been unleashed,  while sanctions on Russia have created the kind of atmosphere dictators love.

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