Abbott (L) and Turnbull (R) in 2009. Photo: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images
The febrile world of Australian politics: Turnbull vs Abbott
By Peter Browne - 12 February 12:37

Following this month's failed backbench revolt against prime minister Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull's position is stronger than ever.

A worker installs a flag advertising the cup. Photo: A worker installs a flag for the cup. Photo: Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images
Letter from Equatorial Guinea: forget human rights – here comes the football
By Jonathan Wilson - 12 February 11:09

When Morocco withdrew from hosting the African Cup of Nations, citing Ebola fears, Equatorial Guinea stepped in. But at what cost?

The squeezed earth. Illustration: Jackson Rees
Will Self: We like to feel cosy in our happy little tribes – but it’s a big world, after all
By Will Self - 12 February 10:54

In my visual field alone there must have been 5,000 people suffering.

A Podemos rally in Madrid. Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
Podemos goes pro: how the Spanish party are fine-tuning their election message
By Liam Aldous - 12 February 10:11

Much has changed since the protests of 2011. Now, last year's upstart party might just be in with a chance.

Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, her sister Razan, and husband Deah Shaddy Barakat. Photo: Facebook
The Chapel Hill shooting: White male atheist murders three Muslim students
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 11 February 14:51

46-year-old Craig Stephen Hicks has been arrested and charged.

David Cameron and Tony Abbott at the Australian War Memorial. Photo: Mark Nolan/Reuters
The rise of the Anglosphere: how the right dreamed up a new conservative world order
By Michael Kenny and Nick Pearce - 10 February 11:19

The Anglosphere has its roots in the Commonwealth tradition. But today's global world has forged a powerful unofficial alliance.

Rohingya children play by a relief tent at Bawdupah's Internally Displaced People camp on the outskirts of Sittwe. Photo: Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images
The Rohingya crisis in Burma has become “a protracted, squalid, stateless status-quo”
By Oliver Griffin - 06 February 14:56

The status of Burma’s Rohingya people has devolved to the point where even naming them has become controversial. We need to do more.

A branch of Paradise brothel in Spain. Photo: Getty
If you think decriminalisation will make prostitution safe, look at Germany's mega brothels
By Sarah Ditum - 05 February 16:19

The Liberal Democrats and Greens both support the decriminalisation of prostitution - in the hope of making it "safe". But Germany legalised it in 2002 and it still isn't "a job like any other". 

US Military Police guard detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Photo: Petty Officer 1st class Shane T. McCoy/U.S. Navy/Getty Image
An extraordinary diary from Guantanamo Bay reveals the failure of American democracy
By David Rose - 05 February 10:17

Detainee Mohamedou Ould Slahi's account of the camp is heartbreaking. But it is crucial the truth is told.

Moazzam Begg. Photo: David Levenson/Getty Images
Moazzam Begg: it's the FBI, the CIA and MI5 who should be questioned
By Sophie McBain - 05 February 10:06

Moazzam Begg was imprisoned as a terror suspect but never tried. Who is he? What does he want? And why are the security services so interested in him?

The party's leader, Pablo Iglesias. Photo: DANI POZO/AFP/Getty Images
Si, we can! How the left-wing Podemos party is rattling the Spanish establishment
By David Mathieson - 05 February 9:34

As the Spanish election approaches, a surge in support for the party has set the clock ticking.

The shipping container: the ubiquitous unit that has been called the “hidden plumbing of globalisation”. Photo: Paul J Richards/AFP/Getty
Welcome to Containerstan: how the shipping container took over the world
By Timothy P A Cooper - 04 February 16:23

The ubiquitous unit of global commerce has infiltrated every sphere of modern life – whether as a means of trafficking, a symbol of gentrification, or a part of political protest.

Eugene de Kock at a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) hearing in Pretoria 1998. Photo: Walter Dhladhla/AFP/Getty
Releasing Prime Evil: what does Eugene de Kock’s parole mean for South Africa?
By Oliver Griffin - 30 January 17:14

Eugene de Kock, the former commander of the apartheid government’s infamous Vlakplaas unit, has been granted parole after serving 20 years of his two life sentences.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Rehtaeh Parsons lived and died. Photo: Brian Burke on Flickr, via Creative Commons
The UnSlut Project: Why we should have cared about Rehtaeh Parsons, and why we didn’t
By Emily Lindin - 30 January 16:15

We are horrified and disgusted by the reaction to the rape and death of Rehtaeh Parsons, but we aren’t surprised.

Syriza supporters wave flags at a 2014 rally. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Don’t let the ridiculous smears fool you: Syriza is no party of the radical “far left”
By Mehdi Hasan - 29 January 15:34

Opposing the logic of neoliberal economics does not mean the Greeks have become Marxists.

In Iraqi security officer guards a church. Photo: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images
Paradise lost: is Christianity doomed in the Middle East?
By Gerard Russell - 29 January 9:10

A religious revival is just one of the factors leaving Christians deserting the Middle East. Diversity must be upheld.

Photo: Adam Berry/Getty Images
The news that GHCQ spies on journalists reveals a threat to a free, independent press
By Peter Wilby - 29 January 8:59

Broadchurch, Page 3, inequality, and the importance of journalistic independence.

The new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis in Athens. Photo: ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
As Greeks pin their hopes on change, Syriza must stand firm against the country’s elite
By Yiannis Baboulias - 28 January 10:47

Can new finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, political economist and game theory academic, negotiate solutions to inequality?

Prisoners and US army soldiers stand behind the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp, which reads "Jedem das seine" (To each his just deserts).  Photo: Eric Schwab/AFP/Getty
Buchenwald in 1945: Richard Crossman tells the story of a holocaust survivor
By Richard Crossman - 27 January 8:58

In this article first published on 23 June 1945, the future Labour minister and New Statesman editor Richard Crossman recounts the experiences of “K”, a survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

A protester from the Westboro Baptist Church. Photo: Kimihiro Hoshino/AFP/Getty Images
“Love is wise and hatred is foolish”: how a son of the Westboro Baptist Church lost faith
By Aoife Moriarty - 26 January 14:35

The controversial church has a firm hold on many of its members. But Nate Phelps, son of the church’s infamous patriarch, wanted out.

Anti-austerity party Syriza wins Greece’s general election
By New Statesman - 26 January 8:35

The party’s leader, and future prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, has vowed to end Greece’s “five years of humiliation and pain”.

Syriza supporters attending a rally in central Athens. Photo: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images
Why the Greek election is so important
By Theo Papadopoulos - 23 January 10:48

If the pollsters are right, Syriza could win by a large margin, ending four decades of two-party rule in Greece.

Five million dollars in cash. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Leader: The 1 per cent and the masses
By New Statesman - 22 January 12:00

The thesis developed by Capital author Thomas Piketty is set to be vindicated, with the most prominent critiques of inequality now economic.

The 11 January Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
France's Arab population is divided by an invisible wall
By Andrew Hussey - 22 January 11:42

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo shooting, we must address France's long war with its Arabs. Andrew Hussey reports from Paris.

New York. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images
How the "mayor" of Gramercy Park keeps New York’s most exclusive spot private
By Rob Crilly - 22 January 10:08

Arlene Harrison runs a tight ship managing Gramercy Park.

A literal tiger mother. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
How Chinese success in education comes at a high cost
By Tanith Carey - 16 January 9:00

The school day often lasts nine hours – with breaks for eye massages to reduce eye strain and physical activity to keep concentration levels high.

An Amnesty protest outside the Saudi embassy in the Hague. Photo: Getty
Why we must help to stop the public flogging of Saudi blogger Raif Badawi
By Daniel Wickham - 15 January 18:53

Despite the crackdown at home, Saudi Arabia is angling to present itself as a supporter of free expression abroad.

French police at the Jewish supermarket in Paris where several people were taken hostage.
Slavoj Žižek on the Charlie Hebdo massacre: Are the worst really full of passionate intensity?
By Slavoj Zizek - 10 January 21:31

How fragile the belief of an Islamist must be if he feels threatened by a stupid caricature in a weekly satirical newspaper, says the Slovenian philosopher.

French police officers stand guard outside Paris' main mosque as people enter for Friday prayers. Photo: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Is the Charlie Hebdo attack really a struggle over European values?
By Myriam Francois-Cerrah - 09 January 13:07

By targeting the French magazine, the attackers were able to deepen already profound rifts in French society and establish an atmosphere ripe for the recruitment of alienated youths.

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