By Rafael Behr - 13 February

Outside the pawnbrokers on Market Street in Eastleigh, Sheena and Carla are taking a cigarette break.

By Sophie Elmhirst - 07 February

Politicians are never happier than when making an announcement.

By Sophie Elmhirst - 07 February

Politicians are never happier than when making an announcement.

By New Statesman - 07 February

“Its anarchic methods may not be ideal, but WikiLeaks improves our understanding of the world and provides for more open and honest government.” That was our verdict on Julian Assange’s

By New Statesman - 07 February

“Its anarchic methods may not be ideal, but WikiLeaks improves our understanding of the world and provides for more open and honest government.” That was our verdict on Julian Assange’s

By Rafael Behr - 07 February

What’s the issue?

By Rafael Behr - 07 February

What’s the issue?

By Kevin Maguire - 07 February

The desperation of a government’s complaints to the BBC is a reliable guide to how much trouble it is in.

By Kevin Maguire - 07 February

The desperation of a government’s complaints to the BBC is a reliable guide to how much trouble it is in.

By Peter Wilby - 07 February

As I understand the government’s approach to childcare, outlined by the early years minister, Elizabeth Truss, it’s fine for one person to look after six babies and toddlers, provided that person

By Peter Wilby - 07 February

As I understand the government’s approach to childcare, outlined by the early years minister, Elizabeth Truss, it’s fine for one person to look after six babies and toddlers, provided that person

Robert Halfon, the Conservative MP for Harlow.
By New Statesman - 06 February

Rarely in recent history has the Conservatives’ self-image as the natural party of government seemed less appropriate.

Robert Halfon, the Conservative MP for Harlow.
By New Statesman - 06 February

Rarely in recent history has the Conservatives’ self-image as the natural party of government seemed less appropriate.

By Rafael Behr - 06 February

Tory MPs know that repetitive disloyalty and conspicuous party division hasten electoral defeat. Yet they cannot line up obediently behind David Cameron.

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