Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. World
  2. Americas
  3. North America
2 November 2011updated 27 Sep 2015 5:37am

Cain’s accuser allegedly got a year’s salary in severance pay

The New York Times claims that woman who made sexual harrassment allegation received $35,00

By Samira Shackle

In the latest instalment in the Herman Cain scandal, the New York Times has alleged that the one of the women who accused the Republican presidential hopeful of sexual harrassment in the 1990s received $35,000 (£22,000) severance pay — one year’s salary — over the incident.

The paper cites “three people with direct knowledge of the payment”, and says that “new descriptions from the woman’s friends and colleagues of her level of discomfort at work” challenge Cain’s claim that he is the victim of a “witchhunt”. The Republican hopeful’s spokesman declined to comment on the severance pay allegation.

Indeed, the scale of the payment will be difficult to justify, if proved true. As I reported earlier this week, Cain has denied all knowledge of any pay-out, telling Fox News:

If the Restaurant Association did a settlement, I wasn’t even aware of it and I hope it wasn’t for much.

Select and enter your email address Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. A weekly newsletter helping you fit together the pieces of the global economic slowdown. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
Visit our privacy Policy for more information about our services, how New Statesman Media Group may use, process and share your personal data, including information on your rights in respect of your personal data and how you can unsubscribe from future marketing communications.
THANK YOU

Adding to the pressure on Cain, a lawyer for the second woman has requested that the National Restaurant Association, where all three parties were employed, lift the non-disclosure agreement so that she can publicly dispute Cain’s version of events.

Content from our partners
What are the green skills of the future?
A global hub for content producers, gaming and entertainment companies in Abu Dhabi
Insurance: finding sustainable growth in stormy markets

In an attempt to focus on the positives, Cain’s team have been trumpeting the support he has received from high profile conservatives, including Rush Limbaugh, and fundraising successes.

However, Cain’s inability to deny that a settlement had been made more or less guaranteed that this story would rumble on, and it is difficult to see how he will recover from it. Asked by conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer if his race was one of the reasons for this negative coverage, he said: “I believe the answer is yes, but we do not have any evidence to support it.” Such attempts to detract attention and shift the blame compound Cain’s initial tactical errors — such as inconsistency about the nature of the “agreement” reached and vagueness about whether a payment had been made. It is time for him to change his tactics, and fast.

 

Cain’s accuser allegedly got a year’s salary in severance pay

The New York Times claims that woman who made sexual harrassment allegation received $35,00

By Samira Shackle

In the latest instalment in the Herman Cain scandal, the New York Times has alleged that the one of the women who accused the Republican presidential hopeful of sexual harrassment in the 1990s received $35,000 (£22,000) severance pay — one year’s salary — over the incident.

The paper cites “three people with direct knowledge of the payment”, and says that “new descriptions from the woman’s friends and colleagues of her level of discomfort at work” challenge Cain’s claim that he is the victim of a “witchhunt”. The Republican hopeful’s spokesman declined to comment on the severance pay allegation.

Indeed, the scale of the payment will be difficult to justify, if proved true. As I reported earlier this week, Cain has denied all knowledge of any pay-out, telling Fox News:

If the Restaurant Association did a settlement, I wasn’t even aware of it and I hope it wasn’t for much.

Adding to the pressure on Cain, a lawyer for the second woman has requested that the National Restaurant Association, where all three parties were employed, lift the non-disclosure agreement so that she can publicly dispute Cain’s version of events.

In an attempt to focus on the positives, Cain’s team have been trumpeting the support he has received from high profile conservatives, including Rush Limbaugh, and fundraising successes.

Content from our partners
What are the green skills of the future?
A global hub for content producers, gaming and entertainment companies in Abu Dhabi
Insurance: finding sustainable growth in stormy markets

However, Cain’s inability to deny that a settlement had been made more or less guaranteed that this story would rumble on, and it is difficult to see how he will recover from it. Asked by conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer if his race was one of the reasons for this negative coverage, he said: “I believe the answer is yes, but we do not have any evidence to support it.” Such attempts to detract attention and shift the blame compound Cain’s initial tactical errors — such as inconsistency about the nature of the “agreement” reached and vagueness about whether a payment had been made. It is time for him to change his tactics, and fast.