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17 February 2011

The NS Interview: Lauren Laverne

“Ageism is wrong. TV is unfair. Equally true, unfortunately."

By Sophie Elmhirst

What sparked your interest in politics?
Growing up during the 1980s in the north-east probably did it. My paternal grandfather was a miner – one of my first memories is of him being on TV during the strike.

Which is home – Sunderland or London?
Put it this way: I always look at both bits of the map on the weather forecast.

You used to be in a band, Kenickie. Do you miss performing?
I don’t. Or at least I wouldn’t want to do it now. I was in the band between the ages of 15 and 21, which I think is the optimum age for those kinds of high jinks.

You’re a DJ (on BBC 6 Music) now. Would you ever return to making music?
I can’t imagine it. But not making records isn’t giving up music – I don’t feel the distinction between loving it and writing it is that important.

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Why do you think the closure of BBC 6 Music was ever proposed?
There’s a bit of a conspiracy theory that it was a genius advertising campaign, but I’m sorry to say it wasn’t. I have to believe that the proposals were made with good intentions, but since part of the BBC’s charter is about stimulating creativity and cultural excellence and the station does that, demonstrably, for a modest sum, it would have been wrong to close it.

Do you think the BBC can get its priorities wrong at times?
I think it gets it right a lot more often than it gets it wrong. “Inform, educate and entertain” is a tough brief to set yourself.

What would be your plan for the BBC if you were in charge?
I’m bloody glad I’m not. Running an organisation with such a broad audience must be almost impossible: like DJing at a wedding, you’re always going to lose part of the crowd no matter which record you put on next. Maybe in both those situations you just have to lead from the front and play something you love.

You co-present 10 O’Clock Live. What’s the greatest challenge of making a live TV show?
The fact that the news never stops happening. But the way I look at it, the bits where everything fucks up can be the most memorable, enjoyable ones. You have to embrace the fact that, if you die on your arse, people will probably love it even more – and think of the Schadenfreude as your special gift to them.

You are outnumbered by your male co-hosts. Do you feel there are too few female presenters?
If that’s the case, I have no idea why. It’s not like you get to be one and they sit you down and go, “We’ve let YOU in. Now let me explain precisely why the others are outside . . . ” like a baddie at the end of Scooby-Doo.

How do you balance motherhood with work?
The challenges are ever-evolving and I negotiate them with great difficulty.

You got a strong reaction when you spoke of the benefits of starting a family early.
I was talking about my experience. I said that when I had my first son I was quite alone, in that not many of my peers had babies. I found
it quite hard, but an advantage now is being in the position of having completed my family. I’m glad I’m not at the beginning of that process. I have absolutely no view on if or when “women” should start having families. Who is “women”? It’s absurd.

Do you think it does get difficult for women in broadcasting as they get older?
I think it gets difficult for women when they’re born and remains so. It isn’t just in broadcasting.

What was your view of the recent case of Miriam O’Reilly at the BBC?
Ageism is wrong. TV is unfair. Equally true, unfortunately.

Is the coalition working?
I like the idea of moving beyond the knee-jerk sniping of party politics, but in practice I can’t see where the Lib Dems are – it’s all cuts and no cushion. It’s a Tory government, isn’t it?

What do you think of Nick Clegg and David Cameron?
I have very little interest in them as individuals. I’m interested in – and generally disapproving of – their policies.

Is religion a part of your life?
Once a Catholic . . . It’s like the Mafia – you don’t get to leave. I’m not sure I’d want to, but I’m incredibly angry with the Church at the moment.

Is there anything you regret?
Worrying when I had the time to.

Is there a plan?
Yes. It involves records, books, gin slings and great shoes. Join in if you like.

Are we all doomed?
No. Because people are (mostly) wonderful.

Defining Moments

1978 Born in Sunderland
1994 Forms the band Kenickie with her brother and two friends from school
1997 Calls the Spice Girls “Tory scum”
1998 Moves into television presenting on The Alphabet Show with Chris Addison
2002 Joins Xfm
2006 Becomes anchor of The Culture Show
2007 Gives birth to her first son
2008 Begins regular show on BBC 6 Music
2011 Becomes co-presenter, 10 O’Clock Live

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