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News

Postcards from Planet Covid

The world has now had more than half a year to get used to the pandemic. As our contributors describe, an array of common experiences have been forged in very different societies.

Latest Issue

New Statesman magazine

Planet Covid

How the virus holds the world in its grip, by Jeremy Cliffe

Plus Robert Harris on why politics is now too strange even for fiction, Helen Thompson on the fragile Union, and Philip Collins on why Brexit is the only thing uniting the Tories

Shakespeare in disrupted times

“Shakespearean” as an adjective has had an unexpected currency in contemporary political journalism – but there are so many other dimensions to a “Shakespearean” sensibility.

Politics

Culture and Books

Shakespeare in disrupted times

“Shakespearean” as an adjective has had an unexpected currency in contemporary political journalism – but there are so many other dimensions to a “Shakespearean” sensibility.

Kim Darroch and the art of the diplomat

Collateral Damage – Darroch’s warm and witty memoir of his time as the British ambassador in Donald Trump’s Washington – is a study in diplomatic tradecraft.

Media, Science and Digital Culture

World

Archive

Taken to Hart

11 July 1975: Students should not continue to be despised for doing no work when work is no longer thought a clever thing to do.

Mr Eliot's poems

20 February 1926: Only those unfortunate persons who are incapable of reading poetry can resist TS Eliot’s rhythms.

The great football racket

26 November 1960: Practical suggestions to help the corrupt and failing game back on its feet.

What government in Japan?

1 September 1945: The day before the Second World War reached an official end, an unsigned editorial asked what lay ahead for the Allies and Japan.