Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

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1. Ed Miliband must promote Britain's place in a new world (Guardian)

The Labour leader can't just react to David Cameron, says Mark Leonard. He has to craft a story that makes sense of Europe.

2. Labour doesn’t need a referendum life raft (Times)

Forty years ago, an EU vote rescued the party, writes David Aaronovitch. This time around it’s a Tory problem that Miliband is right to ignore.

3. Now we see what was really at stake in the miners' strike (Guardian)

Thirty years on, the costs of the gutting of trade unions are obvious, writes Seumas Milne. That's why demonising Bob Crow was a failure.

4. Are Scotland and England really so different? (Daily Telegraph)

As the referendum vote on Scottish independence draws nearer, the issue of distinctiveness is ever more important, writes Allan Massie. 

5. Miliband plays a shrewd hand on Europe (Financial Times)

The Labour Party’s EU policy has outsmarted the Tories, says an FT editorial. 

6. Labour’s unforced error is a gift for its opponents (Daily Telegraph)

Only the Tories offer a realistic chance of the British people finally having a say on Europe, writes Peter Oborne. 

7.  Clegg’s free school meals plan may have some glitches, but who cares? (Independent)

Both sides of this argument could go on until the next election, writes Jane Merrick. 

8. Assisted dying will turn into a lethal weapon (Times)

The public backs euthanasia, writes Tim Montgomerie. But before we empower doctors to kill we should understand where it might lead.

9. A tragic death, yes. But in the name of sanity why are so many sanctifying Bob Crow? (Daily Mail)

The RMT leader did untold harm to the interests of the travelling public, and was shameless in admitting it, says Max Hastings. 

10. School inspections must be free of political meddling (Guardian)

Michael Gove's intimidation of Ofsted shows that the system has to be clearly independent, says Tristram Hunt. Too many heads have lost faith in the quality of inspectors.