Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

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1. Europe needs reform but Britain belongs at its heart (Financial Times)

An arbitrary timetable for a vote on leaving the EU would undermine the real priorities, writes Ed Miliband.

2. Bob Crow was a daily reminder that workers can win (Guardian)

 The RMT leader was a hero because he was authentic, and had no other master than those who elected him, says George Galloway. His death leaves a huge gap.

3. The world has stopped listening to Hague (Times)

The Foreign Secretary should have resigned when MPs rejected his Syrian policy, says Roger Boyes.

4. Bob Crow leaves behind a union movement fighting for survival (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians of left and right are desperate to colonise working people and their communities, writes Mary Riddell. 

5. The spectre of eurozone deflation (Financial Times)

The ECB is failing, writes Martin Wolf. The aim must be to raise inflation, particularly in surplus countries.

6. Bob Crow: an unlikely capitalist (Daily Telegraph)

The RMT leader espoused socialism but did not subscribe to the new left’s snooty disdain for materialism, says a Telegraph editorial. 

7. After Yalta, we can’t betray Ukraine yet again (Times)

The people are crying out for freedom, writes Daniel Finkelstein. We have a duty to respond to their plea, not be cowed by Putin’s aggression.

8. UKIP funding is only an issue because the Establishment is running scared (Independent)

Yet more laughable is the idea our HQ is staffed by weirdos who spend all day in the pub, writes Nigel Farage. 

9. Lie detectors are a hocus-pocus tool for our distrusting state (Guardian)

Buying voice risk analysis tools to root out benefit fraud conceals a darker purpose: to undermine claimants' credibility, says Zoe Williams.

10. As next week’s Budget approaches, ignore anything worth less than £5bn – it’s economically irrelevant (Independent)

Politicians think voters have no idea of the numbers and will react with emotion, writes Hamish McRae.