Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

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1. Aloof Miliband is alienating his own support (Times)

Many sympathisers who find themselves excluded from the leader’s inner circle are losing faith in his ability to win, writes Jenni Russell. 

2. Boris Johnson's will-he-won't-he show risks derailing his party (Guardian)

The mayor of London has to make up his mind over standing for parliament, or he could scupper the Tories' 2015 election campaign, says Paul Goodman. 

3. The silver-bullet solution to the Crimean crisis is clear: work together with Moscow, for our benefit and for that of Ukraine (Independent)

There has to be a way of preventing Russia’s sense of vulnerability from becoming  more dangerous, writes Mary Dejevsky. 

4. Sanctions, yes – but troops are the best way to deter Russia (Times)

Europe should reverse the headlong reduction of defence spending and pay closer attention to Nato’s existing eastern borders, says David Davis. 

5. Social security: a cap designed to confuse (Guardian)

Policy lazily lumps all benefit costs together, irrespective of whether they reflect mismanagement or answer genuine need, notes a Guardian editorial. 

6. Caution is the byword for squeezed UK (Financial Times)

Tory optimism about growth is unlikely to cheer the vast majority of households, says Chris Giles. 

7. There’s a quiet rebellion under way against bossy government (Daily Telegraph)

People need to be free to do what they like, including having a smoke in the pub, argues Peter Oborne. 

8. Caring too much. That's the curse of the working classes (Guardian)

Why has the basic logic of austerity been accepted by everyone, asks David Graeber. Because solidarity has come to be viewed as a scourge.

9. Fox's 21st Century reshuffle ... No need for head-hunters as Murdoch secures top jobs for two sons (Daily Mail)

Murdoch clearly is hoping that his genius will tumble down the generations irrespective of what minority investors might think, writes Alex Brummer. 

10. The man who believed in being ruthless with the NHS (Daily Telegraph)

The government owes a debt to the mandarin who steered through tough NHS reforms, says Sue Cameron.