Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What Nick Clegg doesn't know can still get him into trouble (Guardian)

The Lib Dems' handling of harassment claims has so far been shameful, says Gaby Hinsliff. Their inquiries had best follow their brief – and dig.

2. The Chancellor’s not for turning – or sacking (Times) (£)

The Moody’s downgrading ought to shame our entire political class, who have blocked George Osborne’s plans, says Tim Montgomerie.

3. As Tory austerity inflicts misery on millions, Labour should articulate their alternative to Osbornomics (Independent)

Osborne’s failure must not lead to yet another bout of austerity under Labour, writes Owen Jones.

4. One thing’s clear about Eastleigh: it’ll be a wretched day for Labour (Daily Telegraph)

The magnificent Maria may see off the yellow peril, but Miliband’s man is already down and out, writes Boris Johnson.

5. Sexual claims: institutional failings (Guardian)

Uncertainty about how to proceed after serious allegations are made seems a disturbingly common institutional response, notes a Guardian editorial.

6. Hoist by his own petard... but this is no disaster (Daily Mail)

What sets the UK apart is that we have never, in our entire history, failed to pay back our debt, writes Alex Brummer.

7. Coalition facing a beastly Eastleigh (Sun)

Defeat for either the Lib Dems or the Tories will raise the odds on a coalition split sooner rather than later, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

8. How David Cameron can get more women into politics (Guardian)

 If he wants more female MPs, the prime minister must look at introducing job sharing to help them juggle family and career, says Sarah Wollaston. 

9.. The cyber age demands new rules of war (Financial Times)

A system to check covert violence is needed, writes Zbigniew Brzezinski.

10. How did modern Islam become so intolerant? (Independent)

No injustice can excuse or explain the rise of brutal Islamists, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

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​The US and the EU are shaky allies in Theresa May’s stand-off with Russia

Both Donald Trump and Jean-Claude Juncker undermined the PM by congratulating President Putin on his re-election.

With friends like these, who needs Vladimir Putin? Jean-Claude Juncker and Donald Trump have both undermined Theresa May's attempt at a united front against the Kremlin, as both men congratulated the president on his successful re-election.

The Washington Post has the remarkable details of the Trump-Putin phone call, in which the American President ignored a note saying “DO NOT CONGRATULATE” and neglected a briefing note instructing him to condemn the nerve agent attack on the Skripals. You can read the full letter from Juncker to Putin here. In both cases, what's in the message is fairly ordinary: the offence is one of omission.

How much does it matter as far May's stand-off with the Russian government goes? The difference is that Trump's position matters because he has hard power: it is a result of his Russia position that American sanctions and rhetoric about the attack on the Skripals is not tougher. Juncker's position matters because – while he has been condemned by Donald Tusk, Guy Verhofstadt and large numbers of MEPs – he is representative of a significant strain of public opinion across Europe.

We were given a measure of the size of that caucus in Germany, with polls showing that in excess of 80 per cent of Germans have an unfavourable opinion of Donald Trump, but just over half say the same of Vladimir Putin. In the United Kingdom, one of the EU's more hawkish nations outside the Russian-EU frontier, voters, also have a more unfavourable opinion of Trump (80 per cent) than of Putin (74 per cent). 

Bluntly, the problem May has is that the present incumbent of the White House is a shaky ally and most European politicians, including herself, have electorates who are potentially flaky too. Should Sergey Lavrov's threat that further sanctions will invite further reprisals be made good on, it's not a good starting point for the prime minister.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman and the PSA's Journalist of the Year. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.