Tory rebels force government to give MPs a “meaningful vote” on Brexit

The amendment was put down by Tory MP and former Attorney General Dominic Grieve. 

NS

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The government will be forced to give Parliament the final say on a Brexit deal, after the majority of MPs supported an amendment put down by former Attorney General and Tory “mutineer” Dominic Grieve.

In a major parliamentary defeat for Theresa May, enough Tory MPs joined the opposition parties in supporting the demand for a “meaningful vote” on leaving the EU. Labour and Tory rebels won the vote 309 to 305.

The vote means MPs have a legal right to vote on the Government's Brexit deal.

The defeat came after building tension, with the Evening Standard - now edited by former Tory Chancellor George Osborne - reporting that a government whip’s bullying tactics reduced a female MP to tears.

Remainers from different political parties gathered ahead of the vote to rally support, with Labour backbencher Chuka Umunna launching an email campaign for Remainers to write to their MPs before the vote.

Earlier, shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer tweeted: “Labour will back Dominic Grieve's amendment giving Parliament a proper say on the Brexit deal if he pushes it to a vote tonight. The terms of our future are not for the government alone to determine.”

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.