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Celebrity Brexit wars: which famous people are for and against leaving the EU?

In-listers and Out-listers.

The In-list

Richard Branson

Patrick Stewart

JK Rowling

 

Martin Lewis

Helena Bonham Carter

Peter Davison

 

Chiwetel Ejiofor

Karren Brady

Emma Thompson

Tracey Emin

 

Philip Pullman

Eddie Izzard

 

Ian McKellen

Arsene Wenger

Olly Alexander

 

Idris Elba

Jeremy Clarkson

Elton John

Jo Brand

Armando Iannucci

 

James May

Sophie Okonedo

Steve Coogan

Alexa Chung

 

Hi, I'm IN. Either way PLEASE remember to vote. @villoid

A photo posted by Alexa (@chungalexa) on

 

Mike Leigh

Daisy Ridley

Stephen Hawking

Benedict Cumberbatch

Paloma Faith

Vivienne Westwood

 

A photo posted by lily cole (@lilycole) on

 

Danny Boyle

Dominic West

Damien Hirst

 

Bob Geldof

Richard Curtis

Carol Ann Duffy

John le Carre

Keira Knightley

 

Brian Cox

Bobby George

Kristin Scott Thomas

Jude Law

Lily Cole

 

John Hurt

Derek Jacobi

Dan Smith

David Beckham

 

I'm passionate about my country and whatever the result of Thursday's referendum, we will always be Great. Each side has the right to their opinion and that should always be respected whatever the outcome of the European Referendum. I played my best years at my boyhood club, Manchester United. I grew up with a core group of young British players that included Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, Nicky Butt and the Neville Brothers. Added to that was an experienced group of older British players such as Gary Pallister, Steve Bruce and Paul Ince. Now that team might have gone on to win trophies but we were a better and more successful team because of a Danish goalkeeper, Peter Schmeichel, the leadership of an Irishman Roy Keane and the skill of a Frenchman in Eric Cantona. I was also privileged to play and live in Madrid, Milan and Paris with teammates from all around Europe and the world. Those great European cities and their passionate fans welcomed me and my family and gave us the opportunity to enjoy their unique and inspiring cultures and people. We live in a vibrant and connected world where together as a people we are strong. For our children and their children we should be facing the problems of the world together and not alone. For these reasons I am voting to Remain

A photo posted by David Beckham (@davidbeckham) on

 

Rebecca Front

Juliet Stevenson

Matt Damon

Simon Cowell

Sylvester McCoy

Daniel Craig

 

Billie Piper

Gillian Anderson

Bill Nighy

David Walliams

Rio Ferdinand

Florence Welch

 

Victoria Beckham

Thandie Newton

John Barnes

Douglas Booth

 

He's in, I'm in - are you? #voteremain

A photo posted by Samuel Muston (@smuston) on

 

The Out-list

Julian Fellowes

Roger Daltrey

Ian Botham

Bryan Adams

 

Michael Caine

Keith Chegwin

Duncan Bannatyne

Sol Campbell

John Cleese

Liz Hurley

 

Joan Collins

Katie Hopkins

Cheryl Baker

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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People are not prepared to see innovation at any price - we need to take care of our digital health

Correcting the course of technology in Britain does not need to mean taking backwards steps and becoming an anti-innovation zone.

As individuals, we have never been better connected. As a society, we are being driven further apart.

Doteveryone’s People Power and Technology report, released this week, found that half of the 2,500 British people we surveyed said the internet had made life a lot better for people like them - but only 12 per cent saw a very positive impact on society.

These findings won’t be news to most people living in Brexit Britain - or to anyone who’s been involved in a spat on Twitter. The fact that we’re constantly connected to our smartphones has not necessarily improved our communities or our understanding of one other, and the trails of data we’re leaving behind are not turning into closer social bonds.

Many of the positives we experience are for ourselves as individuals.

Lots of consumer tech puts simple self-sufficiency first - one-click to buy, swipe right to date - giving us a feeling of cosy isolation and making one little phone an everywhere. This powerful individualism is a feature of all of the big platforms - and even social networks like Facebook and Twitter, that are meant bring us together, do so in the context of personalised recommendations and algorithmically ordered timelines.

We are all the centre of our own digital worlds. So it is no surprise that when we do look up from our phones, we feel concerned about the impact on society. Our research findings articulate the dilemma we face: do we do the thing that is easiest for us, or the one that is better for society?

For instance, 78 per cent of people see the Internet as helping us to communicate better, but 68 per cent also feel it makes us less likely to speak to each other face-to-face. 69per cent think the internet helps businesses to sell their products and services, while 53 per cent think it forces local shops to compete against larger companies online.

It’s often hard to see the causality in these trade-offs. At what point does my online shopping tip my high street into decline? When do I notice that I’ve joined another WhatsApp group but haven’t said hello to my neighbour?

When given clear choices, the public was clear in its response.  

We asked how they would feel if an online retailer offered free one-day delivery for lower income families, but this resulted in local shops closing down - 69 per cent found this unacceptable. Or if their bank invested more in combating fraud and cyber crime, but closed their local branch - 61 per cent said it was unacceptable. Or if their council made savings by putting services online and cut council tax as a result, but some people would find it hard to access these services - 56 per cent found it unacceptable.

It seems people are not prepared to see innovation at any price - and not at the expense of their local communities. The poorest find these trade offs least acceptable.

Correcting the course of technology in Britain does not need to mean taking backwards steps and becoming an anti-innovation zone.

A clearer regulatory environment would support positive, responsible change that supports our society, not just the ambition of a few corporations.

Some clarity about our relationship with web services would be a good start. 60 per cent of people Doteveryone spoke to believed there should be an independent body they can turn to when things go wrong online; 89 per cent would like terms and conditions to be clearer, and 47% feel they have no choice but to sign up to services, even when they have concerns.

Technology regulation is complicated and fragmentary. Ofcom and the under-resourced Information Commissioner’s Office, provide some answers,but they are not sufficient to regulate the myriad effects of social media, let alone the changes that new technologies like self-driving cars will bring. There needs to be a revolution in government, but at present as consumers and citizens we can’t advocate for that. We need a body that represents us, listens to our concern and gives us a voice.

And the British public also needs to feel empowered, so we can all make better choices - adults and children alike need different kinds of understanding and capability to navigate the digital world. It is not about being able to code: it is about being able to cope.

Public Health England exists to protect and improve the nation’s health and well-being, and reduce health inequalities. Perhaps we need a digital equivalent, to protect and improve our digital health and well-being, and reduce digital inequalities.

As a society, we should not have to continually respond and adapt to the demands of the big corporations: we should also make demands of them - and we need confidence, a voice, and representation to begin to do that.

Rachel Coldicutt is chief executive of Doteveryone.