Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
  2. /
31 October 2013

The Returning Officer: New Ross

By Stephen Brasher

Colonel C G Tottenham fought the seat of Wicklow East as a Tory in 1885, losing to the Nationalist William Corbet. Tottenham lost again in 1886, 1895 (when Corbet regained the seat he had lost in the Parnellite split) and an 1895 by-election.

He had previously sat for New Ross (1878-80), as had similarly named ancestors since 1802 in the UK parliament and 1727 in the Irish parliament. In 1731 one ancestor earned the name “Boots”, after riding all night to Dublin to cast a vote ensuring that a budget surplus was held in Ireland and not returned to England.

In 1900 the Irish author Alice M P Cooke dedicated her novel His Laurel Crown to Colonel Tottenham, later writing “Irish Heroes in Red War”, poems about the Irish regiments who fought in the First World War.

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy