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  1. Politics
3 October 2012

Ed Miliband’s Labour Q&A: 10 highlights

Labour leader says he will attend anti-austerity march on 20 October.

By George Eaton

A jacketless Ed Miliband, evidently buoyed by the media response to his speech, breezed his way through this afternoon’s Q&A session with Labour delegates. Here are ten notable points from it.

1. Miliband reaffirms his green credentials

After criticism over his failure to mention the environment in yesterday’s speech, the former Climate Change Secretary sought to reaffirm his green credentials. He attacked George Osborne’s belief that “you can either have a good environment or a good economy”, adding: “I don’t know what planet future Osbornes are planning to live on”.

Elsewhere, he said that he was angered that the aviation debate was dominated by economic considerations, rather than environmental ones. If the UK was to meet its legally-binding commitment to reduce emissions by 80% by 2050, aviation had to “play its role”.

2. “Comrades”

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Evidently convinced that he’s seen off the “Red Ed” jibes, Miliband twice addressed delegates in the traditional socialist manner – “comrades”.

3. Miliband will attend anti-cuts demo

To cheers from delegates, Miliband confirmed that he would attend the TUC’s anti-austerity march on 20 October.

4. Living wage: “not a panacea”

While promising to work to ensure that more employers pay the living wage, Miliband emphasised that it was not “a panacea”.

“It doesn’t solve the problem, it will just make a difference over and above the minimum wage,” he said.

He promised to consider whether government contractors should be legally obliged to pay the living wage but added that fiscal constraints meant this may not be feasible.

5. Rejects free schools

Shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg has promised that Labour will support free schools provided they meet certain tests, but Miliband cited them as an example of where the coalition was going wrong, suggesting that they are, by definition, a negative development.

6. On Trident: “I’m not a unilateralist”

Invited to support nuclear disarmament, Miliband replied that he was not a “unilateralist” but a “multilateralist” (a stance that will likely disappoint his mother, an early CND activist). The government should aim to retain the “minimum deterrent” required for security purposes, he said.

7. Supports votes at 16

Miliband confirmed his support for lowering the voting age and argued that the government would have reconsidered its decision to abolish the Educational Maintenance Allowance were 16-year-olds were able to vote.

8. Opposes Labour candidates in Northern Ireland

While he wished Labour members standing for election in Northern Ireland well, Miliband said that he feared it would compromise the British government’s status as an “honest broker”.

9. Reassurance on public sector pay freeze

Miliband emphasised the need for pay restraint in the public sector but sought to reassure delegates by stating that he “was not talking about the next parliament”. He added that Labour would not implement the 1% pay cap in the same way as the government, there would be more discrimination.

10. Who will win the election

Seeking to frame the 2015 election campaign, Miliband said that the winner would be the party that “unites, rather than divides, Britain”.