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  1. Business
3 April 2012

Other people’s business, Tuesday 3 March

Breakfast: the most lucrative meal of the day?

By New Statesman

 

1. Cosmetics courtship: Propositioning the Avon lady, Schumpeter

After proposing three times in private last month, the persistent suitor went public, writes Schumpeter.

2. Despite all the grumbling, the World Bank job will likely still go to the American, (Washington Post)

The campaign for president of the World Bank has come down to three people, writes Brad Plumer.

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3. Breakfast, the most important (fundraising) meal of the day, (Washington Post)

Planet Money has teamed up with the Sunlight Foundation for an interesting look at how, exactly, money transfers hands in politics, writes Sarah Kliff.

4. Corporate cash surplus will be easy to misspend, (Reuters)

Everyone knows that companies worldwide are sitting on cash. But where will it go? asks Chris Hughes.

5. Who Should Be Responsible for the “Stalker” App?, (Portfolio)

Who is responsible for creating such a potentially dangerous app in the first place? asks