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22 February 2012updated 26 Sep 2015 8:31pm

Atheist in memory lapse and slavery shock

A riposte to the "smear tactics" used against the evolutionary biologist

By New Statesman

Buy a copy of this week’s New Statesman, The God Wars, here

Following Richard Dawkins’s Today programme exchange with Giles Fraser over the New Testament and Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, the evolutionary biologist and former New Statesman guest editor addresses the “smear tactics” used against him over the past week, first of which was the former canon chancellor’s attempt on radio:

Far from being a real gotcha, Fraser’s diversionary tactic can only be seen as a measure of desperation, designed to conceal the embarrassing ignorance of their holy book shown by 64 per cent of Census Christians [people who self-identified in the 2001 census as “Christian”]. In any case Darwin’s Origin, I hope I don’t have to add, is nobody’s holy book.

In the cover story of this week’s magazine, available in shops tomorrow, Dawkins also presents the results of a large-scale Ipsos MORI poll into Britain’s relationship with Christianity. Among initial findings such as that the percentage of the population which describes itself as Christian has dropped from 72 to 54 per cent, Dawkins reports that:

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“I try to be a good person” came top of the list of “what being a Christian means to you”, but mark the sequel. When the Census Christians were asked explicitly, “When it comes to right and wrong, which of the following, if any, do you most look to for guidance?”only 10 per cent chose “Religious teachings and beliefs”. Fifty-four per cent chose “My own inner moral sense” and a quarter chose “Parents, family or friends”. Those would be my own top two and, I suspect, yours, too.

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Dawkins states that these facts – not negotiable opinions – cannot be changed by smears and irrelevant digressions:

In modern Britain, not even Christians put Christianity anywhere near the heart of their lives, and they don’t want it put at the heart of public life either. David Cameron and Baroness Warsi, please take note.

god wars

Buy a copy of this week’s New Statesman, The God Wars, here