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11 February 2011

The voters are finally turning against the Tories

Lib Dem “human shields” are no longer protecting the Tories from the cuts backlash.

By George Eaton

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Latest poll (YouGov/Sun) Labour majority of 98.

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Until recently it was common to hear Labour MPs warn that the Tories’ use of the Lib Dems as “human shields” would insulate them from anger over the cuts. Their fears were supported by polls showing that support for the Conservatives had risen since the general election while support for the Lib Dems had fallen as low as 7 per cent. But this week, that began to change.

The latest daily YouGov survey puts Labour on 44 per cent, with the Tories on 35 per cent and the Lib Dems on 10 per cent. Conservative support is now at its lowest level since the election and what was a 3-5 point Labour lead has become a 7-9 point lead. Five of the last eight YouGov polls have put the Tories on less than 37 per cent.

New Statesman Poll of Polls

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Labour majority of 80 (uniform swing)

The VAT rise, combined with the stalled economic recovery, has turned public opinion decisively against the party for the first time since May. The boos that greeted Francis Maude’s comments on Labour and the deficit on last night’s Question Time were a sign of how the mood has changed.

In truth, they merely confirmed what polls have shown for some time: the majority of voters oppose the speed and scale of the coalition’s fiscal retrenchment and largely blame the banks and the global recession for the deficit, not Labour.

The political result of the Tories’ plummeting support will be a growing demand for what Tim Montgomerie calls “mainstream Conservative” policies and an impatience with perceived concessions to the Lib Dems. For months, Tory cabinet ministers have been more focused on the Lib Dems’ poll ratings than their own but, after this week, that should begin to change.