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17 June 2010updated 27 Sep 2015 2:18am

Kyrgyzstan crisis: in pictures

Violence against ethnic Uzbeks in Kyrgyzstan has left at least 178 people dead and up to 275,000 dis

By Samira Shackle

Above, Uzbek women mourn in Jalal-Abad. The violence broke out last Friday and quickly spread to the village from Osh, 25 miles away, and to other Uzbek villages in the south.

Kyrgyzstan

Men cry in the village of Shark, outside Osh, by a destroyed building.

Kyrgyizstan

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A wrecked building near the People’s Friendship University in Jalal-Abad.

Kyrgyzstan

Ethnic Uzbek men dig graves in Osh. According to the official toll, 178 people are dead. Many on the ground claim this is a huge underestimate, and that the real figure is closer to 2,000.

Kyrgyzstan

Men pray at a funeral in Osh. The clashes are the worst ethnic violence to hit southern Kyrgyzstan since 1990. Government forces are accused of being complicit in the slaughter.

Kyrgystan

Ethnic Uzbek women cry and plead for help at a refugee camp in Nariman, ten kilometres outside Osh, on the border with Uzbekistan. Up to 200,000 Uzbeks are homeless but stranded in Kyrgyzstan.

Kyrgystan

Refugees gather by the border with Uzbekistan. On Monday, the country ordered its borders closed to tens of thousands of refugees. About 75,000 are thought to have crossed the frontier before this.

Kyrgyzstan

Uzbeks hand bread over the border to refugees in the Nariman camp.

All photos from AFP/Getty Images.

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