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Uncle Sam’s military footprint

Bases by numbers:
Afghanistan (16 to 80+), Alaska (166), Algeria (1), American Samoa (1), Antigua (1), Aruba (1), Ascension Island (1), Australia (4), Bahamas (6), Bahrain (8), Belgium (18), Bolivia (1), Bosnia and Herzegovina (2), Bulgaria (1), Canada (2), Chad (1), Colombia (6), Côte d'Ivoire (1), Crete (1), Curaçao (1), Czech Republic (1), Denmark (1), Diego Garcia (1), Djibouti (1), Ecuador (1), Egypt (1), El Salvador (1), Equatorial Guinea (1), Ethiopia (1), Farallon de Medinilla (1), Gabon (1), Georgia (1), Germany (287), Greece (7), Greenland (1), Guam (31), Haiti (8), Hawaii (84), Honduras (1), Hong Kong (1), Iceland (11), India (1), Iraq (55 to 100+), Israel (6), Italy (89), Japan (130), Johnston Atoll (1), Jordan (1), Kosovo (1), Kuwait (16), Kwajalein Atoll (1), Kyrgyzstan (1), Liberia (1), Luxembourg (3), Macedonia (1), Mali (1), Mauritania (1), Morocco (1), Netherlands (3), New Zealand (1), Niger (1), Norway (3), Oman (1), Pakistan (5), Paraguay (1), Peru (3), Philippines (2), Poland (6), Portugal (21), Puerto Rico (40), Qatar (1), Romania (1), Rota (1), Saipan (1), São Tomé and Príncipe (1), Saudi Arabia (1), Senegal (1), Sierra Leone (1), Singapore (4), South Korea (106), Spain (5), Sri Lanka (1), St Croix and St Thomas (19), Taiwan (1), Tajikistan (1), Tanzania (1), Thailand (1), Tinian (1), Tunisia (1), Turkey (19), Uganda (1), United Arab Emirates (2), UK (57), US (4,135), Uzbekistan (1), Yemen (1)

The numbers cited here are the most accurate available. Because of the size and complexity of the base network, and the secrecy surrounding it, locations are not always precise. The bases in countries such as Italy and Japan have been represented by blocks of colour because they are so numerous.

Sources: Global Policy Forum, US Military Bases Map, 2007; US department of defence, Base Structure Report, Fiscal Year 2007; Transnational Institute, Military Bases Google Earth File

Map: Kristina Ferris Research: Samira Shackle