Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Culture
30 May 2010updated 27 Sep 2015 4:07am

Dennis Hopper, 1936-2010

Death of a “a C-list Method actor of the Fifties with anger-management issues”.

By Jonathan Derbyshire

Dennis Hopper, who died yesterday at the age of 74, figured prominently in David Flusfeder’s recent piece for the NS on the “outlaw cinema” of 1970s Hollywood. Flusfeder’s article was organised around a photograph of Hopper at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival in the company of the directors Donald Cammell, Alejandro Jodorowsky and Kenneth Anger.

Hopper is described, memorably, as “a C-list Method actor of the Fifties with anger-management issues who is still cruising after his directorial debut, Easy Rider”. Flusfeder identifies that film, which has loomed large in the media reaction to Hopper’s death, as

the beginning of the second golden age of American cinema, “outlaw Hollywood”. The astonishing success of Easy Rider had taught the studios that music and drugs and radicalism made for good box office. There was an audience appetite for a cinema of anxiety and meaning — or, if not actual meaning, then at least a search for it, with a rock’n’roll soundtrack.

But Hopper’s finest hour, as an actor at least, wasn’t Easy Rider, nor Rebel Without a Cause nor Apocalypse Now; it was his performance as Tom Ripley in Wim Wenders’s 1977 film The American Friend, an adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s novel Ripley’s Game. In this scene, Ripley visits Derwatt, a painter-turned-forger played by the director Nicholas Ray (who had directed Hopper in Rebel more than 20 years earlier):

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.

Content from our partners
How do we secure the hybrid office?
How materials innovation can help achieve net zero and level-up the UK
Fantastic mental well-being strategies and where to find them