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17 April 2012updated 26 Sep 2015 7:31pm

Opinionomics | 17 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring minimum taxes and money taxes.

By Alex Hern

1. Inflation shows why it pays to follow Bank of England actions not words (Telegraph)

Ian Cowie points out that the Bank of England’s actions – how it runs its pension fund, for instance – explain its attitudes to inflation far better than its words.

2. The Buffett Rule: Right Goal, Wrong Tool (New York Times)

Leonard E. Burman argues that the “Buffett rule” (and, to a certain extent, Osborne’s tycoon tax) is a good policy goal, but would be better achieved by tightening loopholes directly

3. Export-led growth is so damn difficult (ToUChstone)

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Richard Exell points out how bad our trade deficit is.

4. The buck shrinks here (Economist | Free Exchange)

Ryan Avent takes issue with Matt Yglesias’ plan to, in effect, tax money to prevent depressions. His concern isn’t with the political angle of it, but the economic.

5. “The Migration Myth” (Economist’s View)

Mark Thoma collates some interesting writing on migration.