Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Business
  2. Economics
10 April 2012updated 26 Sep 2015 7:46pm

Opinionomics | 10 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis, including the death of publishing.

By Alex Hern

1. Squatters could gain from millionaires’ attempts to beat Stamp Duty as house prices fall (Telegraph)

Now that the pasty-tax fuss is dying down, sensible Ian Cowie examines the Chancellor’s stamp duty changes.

2. Publishing is no longer a job or an industry — it’s a button (GigaOm)

Matthew Ingram elaborates on Clay Shirky’s provocative claim that the publishing industry is obselete.

3. Is George Osborne questioning capitalism? (Left Foot Forward)

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

Jules Peck looks at the Chancellor’s political philosophy.

4. Marrying up and down (Tim Worstall)

Worstall argues that the entry of women in the workplace is having a strong effect on income inequality.

5. Place-dependent output (Economist | Free Exchange)

Ryan Avent analyses the link between urbanisation and productivity in the US.