Cameron loses his rag: 5 of the best

Video clips of the Prime Minister losing his temper.

David Cameron's temper is becoming legendary (and not in a good way), with Ed Miliband making concerted efforts to rile him in Prime Minister's Questions. It's a clear weak spot. Last week, the Labour leader said that he hoped Cameron would be getting anger management lessons before his appearance at the Leveson inquiry. After Cameron lost his temper again today, we have collated five of his "finest" moments.

1. The muttering idiot

Ed Balls takes great delight in teasing Cameron at PMQs, and hit his target today, being called the 'muttering idiot opposite' by Cameron. The speaker asked for the remark to be withdrawn.

2. “Calm down dear”

Cameron alienates feminists (and Michael Winner-haters) everywhere by telling Angela Eagle MP to “calm down dear, calm down, calm down” when he mistakenly said Dr Howard Stoate had lost his seat in the previous election. He hadn't, he'd stood down.

3. Help the aged

Dennis Skinner, 80, was told by the Prime Minister "Well, the honourable gentleman has the right, at any time, to take his pension and I advise him to do so," after the MP accused Cameron of letting Jeremy Hunt take the blame for his inappropriate relationships with News International. So that's the geriatric vote gone.

4. Balls again

It's fair to say the House of Commons sometimes has the atmosphere of the school room. Never more so than David Cameron's snapping at the two Eds as he heard them talking during his speech. He said “I wish the Shadow Chancellor would occasionally shut up and listen to the answer.” and labelled Balls “the most annoying person in modern politics”.

5. "I know you're frustrated"

Cameron hit the feminists again, patronising Nadine Dorries, when he said “I know you're very frustrated”, over the abortion debate, then tried to restrain his giggles. Statesmanlike.

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Will the Brexit Cabinet talks end in a “three baskets” approach?

The joy of the three baskets idea is that everyone gets to tell themselves that it will be their basket that ends up the fullest. 

It's decision day in the Brexit talks. Again.

The Brexit inner Cabinet will meet to hammer out not its final position, but the shape of its negotiating position. The expected result: an agreement on an end state in which the United Kingdom agrees it will follow EU regulations as it were still a member, for example on aviation; will agree to follow EU objectives but go about them in its own way, for example on recycling, where the British government wants to do more on plastic and less on glass; and finally, in some areas, it will go its way completely, for instance on financial services. Or as it has come to be known in Whitehall, the "three baskets" approach.

For all the lengthy run-up, this bit isn't expected to be difficult: the joy of the three baskets idea is that everyone gets to tell themselves that it will be their basket that ends up the fullest. There are two difficulties: the first is that the EU27 won't play ball, and the second is that MPs will kick off when it emerges that their preferred basket is essentially empty.

The objections of the EU27 are perhaps somewhat overwritten. The demands of keeping the Irish border open, maintaining Europol and EU-wide defence operations means that in a large number of areas, a very close regulatory and political relationship is in everyone's interests. But everyone knows that in order for the Conservative government to actually sign the thing, there is going to have to be some divergence somewhere.

The bigger problem is what happens here at home when it turns out that the third basket - that is to say, full regulatory autonomy - is confined to fishing and the "industries of the future". The European Research Group may have a few more letters left to send yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman and the PSA's Journalist of the Year. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.