Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the morning papers.

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1. I oppose the bill, but don't idealise the NHS. There's room to improve (Guardian)

My family is from one of the parts of the country that is, statistically, less well-served by the health service. I'm not bitter, but the NHS did not save my father's life, writes Deborah Orr.

2. The civil servants are the masters now - and our democracy suffers (Telegraph)

Attempts to reform human rights law are being frustrated by liberal bureaucrats, writes Charles Moore.

3. Barack, Dave and a tawdry PR jaunt (Daily Mail)

The Mail's leader column takes issue with David Cameron's visit to Washington.

4. Rowan Williams was brilliant, but failed to bridge chasm of divided church (Guardian)

For all his charm, the archbishop of Canterbury will long be remembered for the way he dealt with the gay issue, writes Giles Fraser.

5. Dave's a great president. But we need a PM (Times) (£)

Mr Cameron is proving a reassuring presence at the top. It's just that he won't do the things that need doing, writes Matthew Parris.

6. Britain is no country for young men (FT) (£)

The average 20-something is no better off today than at the turn of the century, writes John McDermott.

7. A Canterbury Tale (Times) (£)

In seeking Anglican unity, Rowan Williams has pursued an impossible task to little obvious effect, argues the Times leader column.

8. We can feel the love, Mr President, but why? (Telegraph)

History teaches us that whenever a president woos a PM it can only be bad news for Britain, writes Matthew Norman.

9. Germany, Europe's reluctant Goliath, is hiding its true strength (Guardian)

Germany is saving the eurozone from disaster, but it can't glory in its role. The past means it still fears its own shadow, writes Jonathan Freedland.

10. Who speaks for the anti-war voter? (New Yorker)

When those who are not Donald Trump's natural constituents think that he may be making sense, something striking is going on, writes Amy Davidson.