"Squeezed middle" named word of the year

Ed Miliband's phrase beats "Arab spring" and "phone hacking" to the honour.

It might have been relentlessly mocked by the Westminster village but Ed Miliband's phrase "squeezed middle" has beaten "Arab spring" and "phone hacking" to be named word of the year by the Oxford English Dictionary. It's testament to the quiet success of the phrase, first used by Miliband in a Sunday Telegraph article on 26 September 2010, the day after he was elected as Labour leader. Long before David Cameron and Nick Clegg, Miliband identified the fall in living standards as the defining issue of 2011.

Oxford Dictionaries spokeswoman Susie Dent said: "The speed with which squeezed middle has taken root, and the likelihood of its endurance while anxieties deepen, made it a good candidate for word of the year."

Precise definitions may vary (the best I've heard is those too poor to thrive in a market economy, but too rich to rely on state benefits) but no one denies that Miliband is onto something. As for David Cameron, he can console himself with the fact that he has already left his mark on the English language. "Big society" was named word of the year in 2010.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The snowflake Daily Mail cries over free market capitalism taking our blue passports

UK, hun?

The poor old whining snowflakes at the Daily Mail have discovered that maybe it’s better to put the state above private companies after all.

They’ve run a ranty yet doleful lament on their front page about Britain’s “ruling class” (which they are definitely, definitely not part of, of course) showing its “hate” for “our country” by letting a Franco-Dutch firm make our post-Brexit blue passports:

“Today the Mail has a question for Britain’s ruling class: Why DO you hate our country, its history, culture and the people’s sense of identity?”

In a beautiful bit of irony, the £490m contract to make our grim new tickets to bigotry was awarded to Gemalto, a Franco-Dutch firm that beat the British-based De La Rue (lol) that also tried bidding for the contract.

The Mail’s complaint seems to be that the bloody Frogs shouldn’t be making our passports – the UK should be doing it instead. So, according to this logic, either the state should make them, or, to guarantee a private British firm winning the contract, the state should ignore free market forces?

Neither seem particularly in tune with the Mail’s usual preferences. Nor those of the Tory Brexiteers, for that matter.

Yes, this is part of European competition law – big public contracts like this have to be open to bids from across the EU. But right-wingers in this country don’t seem to mind when foreign companies run our railways (Greater Anglia, West Midlands and ScotRail franchises are majority-owned by the Dutch state company Abellio).

Looks like these over-sensitive social justice warriors want to have their cake and eat it. Political correctness gone mad.

I'm a mole, innit.