Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

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1. Save Europe's unity now (Financial Times) (£)

If Europe fails the euro will fail, and uncountable strands in the fabric of European integration will unravel, argues the FT.

2. No 10's strategy? To let the Fox tire itself out before going in for kill (Independent)

If Liam Fox were to return to the back benches, he would be free to channel unrest about the Coalition, argues Oliver Wright.

3. Fast and Loose (Times) (£)

Liam Fox has caused consternation by allowing a friend unparalleled and unhealthy access to the Ministry of Defence. He should consider the implications

4. Foolish? Certainly. Weird? A bit. But not worth a resignation (Telegraph)

Liam Fox shouldn't have to resign, writes Benedict Brogan.

5. Write off Ed Miliband's sharp team and radical rethink? (Guardian)

Far too glib, argues Jackie Ashley.

6. They are all Eurosceptics now (Independent)

The Coalition partners aren't nearly as far apart on Europe as most people believe, says Mary Ann Sieghart.

7. "Made in Britain" matters. Let's encourage it (Times) (£)

Vince Cable argues that light-touch industrial policy will revive manufacturing and restore its role in our economy

8. Without a new airport, British businesses will be left behind (Telegraph)

Our inability to fly to new destinations gives European firms a major trade advantage, argues Boris Johnson.

9. The wretched scandal of Gaza (Telegraph)

Despite the Palestinians' appeal to the UN for statehood, Gaza remains in a state of siege, lacking basic food and sanitation, writes Mary Riddell.

10. India's Tommy Hilfiger utopia is a bluff that will soon be called across the globe (Guardian)

Here as elsewhere, the elite's shops and private universities won't long hide rising poverty and educational decline, argues Pankaj Mishra.