John Gray is the New Statesman's lead book reviewer. His latest book is "The Immortalisation Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death (Penguin, £9.99).

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Books
10 July 2000
Writing on economics tends to mirror the fortunes of the economy. Today, a 20-year boom in stock prices has produced a...
Books
19 June 2000
The novels for which Patricia Highsmith is likely to be remembered were published in the 1950s and 1960s, but they...
Politics
24 April 2000
When Wall Street is hit by panic selling, a huge political investment in the global market begins to slump as well....
Food and Drink
20 March 2000
When Margaret Thatcher came to power, she was equipped with few of the ideas that others, some years later, came to...
Food and Drink
14 February 2000
Although they are commonly bracketed together, it is hard to think of two more antithetical writers than J R Tolkien...
Books
24 January 2000
The idea that the United Kingdom is an ancien regime on the edge of break-up is becoming commonplace, uniting...
Politics
22 November 1999
In his last years, Willie Whitelaw began to worry that there would be serious trouble over fox-hunting. He couldn't...
Books
23 August 1999
In The Scientific Outlook, a virtually forgotten book he published in the early 1930s, Bertrand Russell inquired what...
Food and Drink
10 May 1999
Derelict airfields, drained swimming pools, encroaching sand dunes, mangled cars, drowned cities - if these images...
Ideas
09 April 1999
A great American poet, John Ashbery, wrote that tomorrow is easy, but today is uncharted. He put his finger on our real...
Culture
19 February 1999
If it is true that we are all liberals now, what liberalism means today is anyone's guess. There is little consensus on...
Books
20 November 1998
Nietzsche wrote somewhere that all philosophy is involuntary biography. It is hard to think of a philosopher of whom...

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