The high court made a controversial ruling on a drug implicated in botched executions. Photo: Getty
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The lethal injection ruling that takes America another step away from banning executions

Has a recent Supreme Court ruling made it harder to defend people on death row?

UPDATE 15/7/15

David Zink was executed by the state of Missouri yesterday at 19:41. 

Sindel said: 

These cases are always very difficult. You’re dealing with a man 14 years after the crime. 14 years different. He’s not the same person he was. You can’t really stop the feelings and emotion that goes with that sometimes. We were optimistic, perhaps mistakenly so.

We saw Zink yesterday. He had become religious. He was a regular reader of the bible and he said he hoped there could be forgiveness for what he had done. He apologised to the victim’s family. He’d become resigned to what was going to happen.

***

Next week is the year anniversary of Joseph Wood’s execution. A convicted murderer, he was given a cocktail of drugs by the state of Arizona – a lethal injection. It took two hours for him to die. It was the third highly problematic execution in 2014, after the similarly harrowing deaths of Dennis McGuire in Ohio and Clayton Lockett in Oklahoma.

The execution induced wildly different reactions from states. Arizona suspended its death penalty programme. Utah re-introduced the option of execution by firing squad. Nebraska outlawed the death penalty completely earlier this year.

They were all responding, at least in part, to the same possibility  that the lethal injection in America would be ruled as unconstitutional. Last month that very nearly happened.

On 29 June, the Supreme Court ruled in the case of Glossip vs Gross. Three Oklahoma inmates on death row argued that the use of Midazolam – used in the three bungled executions last year – should be ruled as a “cruel and unusual punishment”. The eighth amendment of the American constitution expressly forbids this. They lost by five votes, to four.

Crucially, however, the details of the ruling have consequences for attorneys defending people on death row up and down the country. 

Rick Sindel and Kay Parish represent death row inmate David Zink. In 2001, he murdered 19-year-old Amanda Morton after he had rear-ended her car off a freeway in Missouri. After raping her he admitted to strangling Morton and then cutting her spinal cord so that she would “remain that way”. He buried her body in a graveyard. The state of Missouri has set his date of execution for 14 July – tomorrow.

David Zink is due to be executed this week.

His legal team are in the last stages of appeal. His confession means that their main focus falls on the type of drugs that Missouri intends to use to kill Zink.

Sindel and Parish are one of the first, if not the first, lawyers who have to work with the ramifications of the Supreme Court’s ruling.

The most notable problem they have is with a specific judgement – that lawyers using the “cruel and unusual punishment” defence must suggest an alternative form of execution that is not cruel and unusual. Or as Parish says “lawyers must tell a court how to kill our clients”.

It puts lawyers like Sindel and Parish, who are viscerally against capital punishment, in a difficult position.

“It’s a pretty nasty ruling in my opinion, and one that puts those of us trying to prevent our clients from being forcibly subject to this human experimentation in quite an ethical quandary”, says Parish.

The decision suggests that method x cannot be cruel and unusual because you have not explained a better method. Or to put it another way, it asks people who believe that all methods of execution are cruel and unusual to accept the court’s contention that there are humane and dignified forms of execution.

After much deliberation Zink’s team decided last week not to suggest an alternative form of capital punishment.

It’s left Sindel and Parish in a fairly desperate position. Previously they had argued that Missouri’s lethal agent – a form of “pentobarbital” was illegal. They claimed the drug was made by an unknown compounding pharmacy and was a “copy” of an FDA-approved drug, rather than a directly approved agent.

David Zink (left) as a young child.

They also put forward the argument that the method of execution violated state and federal controlled substance laws because the compounded pentobarbital is procured by an invalid “prescription”  written by a doctor who is contractually-bound to write the prescription and who conducts no medical examination.

It didn’t work.

As a result, another lawyer has decided to take one last roll of the dice. Justin Gelfand is an attorney with a very different legal specialism to Sindel and Parish. He’s a former federal tax prosecutor. Counterintuitively he thinks he might be able to save Zink’s life using his own specialisms in tax law.

Gelfand has prepared a public interest lawsuit using an obscure law, a Taxpayers Suit. The law has never been used in this context in Missouri legal history. It allows an action to be brought by a private individual to prevent state or federal government from unlawfully diverting public funds. It is generally used in cases of corruption or impropriety. It’s been filed by four (carefully chosen) plaintiffs, including a former member of the Missouri Senate and a Catholic nun, no less.

They argue that the suit “is not about the general legality of the death penalty in Missouri or elsewhere,” but has been filed because “Missouri public officials responsible for overseeing and administering executions are violating federal and state law using the tax dollars of hardworking Missourians.” 

The suit makes particular reference to arguments made by Sindel, Parish and others  that the state of Missouri’s use of compound pentobarbital is illegal – arguments that had previously been dismissed by Missouri courts.

The hearing for the lawsuit will continue today, less than 24 hours before Zink’s execution date. We’ll know by tomorrow whether it’s been successful, though as it’s never been used before it’s a bit of a long shot. It marks the penultimate day of years of appeals that have fallen on deaf ears in Missouri courts.

The Supreme Court’s decision won’t stop lawyers like Sindel and Parish, but it does make their lives harder. “There are those of us who just won’t give up as long as there is breath in our bodies”, says Sindel. It’s the language of hope, perhaps, over expectation. 

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Why orphanages are not the answer to Hurricane Matthew’s devastation

For this year’s New Statesman Christmas charity campaign, we are supporting the work of Lumos in Haiti.

Two weeks after Hurricane Matthew made landfall, I found myself driving along the Haitian coast, 40 miles north of Port-Au-Prince. The storm had barely impacted this part of the country when it hit in early October. There were a few days of rain, some felled trees, and locals complained that water ate away at the beachfront. But nothing remotely comparable to the devastation in other parts of the country.

In an odd turn of events, I found myself traveling in this relatively untouched central zone with two young American women – missionaries. “And there’s an orphanage,” one pointed out as we zoomed by. “And here’s another one too,” the other said, just on the opposite side of the road. They counted them like a memory game: remembering where they’ve popped up, their names, how many children are housed within their walls.

The young women spoke of the neglect and abuse they witnessed in some of them. No matter how “good” an orphanage might be, it simply cannot replace the love, attention, and security provided by a safe family environment. “And it doesn’t matter if the kids look OK. It doesn’t mean anything. You know it’s not right,” the younger of the two quietly says. She was a volunteer in one that cared for 50 children at the time. “Most people who live and work in Haiti don’t like the orphanage system. We keep getting them because of Americans who want to help but don’t live in Haiti.”

In the quick mile of road that we covered, they identified nine orphanages. Two of the orphanages housed less than 10 children, six averaged around 40 children. One housed over 200 children. All but one was set up in the months following the 2010 earthquake. There was a significant increase in the number of orphanages across Haiti in the next four years.

The institutionalisation of children is still the go-to response of many Western donors. US funders have a quick and relatively cheap access to Haiti, not to mention an established history of support to orphanages with nearly seven years’ investment since the earthquake. Many local actors and organisations, international NGO staff, and others in the child protection sphere share the same fear: that many new orphanages will crop up post-hurricane.

But it’s not just orphanage donors who do not understand the true impact of their interventions. Humanitarian relief workers have a gap in institutional knowledge when it comes to best practice in emergency response for this particular vulnerable group of children.

Nearly two months on from the hurricane, rain and flooding continue to hamper humanitarian relief efforts in the south of Haiti. Over 806,000 people still need urgent food assistance and 750,000 safe water, and 220,000 boys and girls remain are at risk, requiring immediate protection. But what about the virtually invisible and uncounted children in orphanages? These children cannot line up to receive the food aid at relief agency distribution centers. They cannot take advantage of child-friendly spaces or other humanitarian services.

We must find a way of reaching children in orphanages in an emergency, and bring their situations up to an acceptable standard of care. They have the right to clean water, food, medical attention, education, and safe shelter – like all other children. But therein lies the catch: orphanages cannot just be rehabilitated into perceived best options for vulnerable families. A balance must be struck to care for institutionalised children in the interim, until family tracing and reunification can occur. Simultaneously, families must be strengthened so that they do not see orphanages as the only option for their children.

We know that nine orphanages per mile does not equal a good emergency response. Housing children along an isolated strip of road segregates them from their families and communities, and violates their best interests and their human rights.

Since I visited Haiti last, Lumos, in partnership with the Haitian government and local partners, has documented over 1,400 children in 20 orphanages in the hurricane-affected South. Vulnerable families have been strengthened in efforts to avoid separation, and we are working with the government to ensure that no new children are placed in orphanages.

We are all worried that, without concerted messaging, efforts to raise awareness among donors, relief agencies, and families, the orphanage boom will happen again in Haiti. And though Haiti is susceptible to natural disaster, its families and children shouldn’t have to be. In seven years we cannot find ourselves repeating the same sorry mantra: “and there’s another orphanage, and another, and another. . .”

Jamie Vernaelde is a researcher with Lumos, based in Washington, DC. Follow her on Twitter: @jmvernaelde

This December, the New Statesman is joining with Lumos to raise money to help institutionalised children in Haiti return to family life. In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, funds are needed to help those who have become separated from their families. Please consider pledging your support at http://bit.ly/lumosns

Thanks to Lumos’s 100 per cent pledge, every penny of your donation goes straight to the programme. For more information, see: http://wearelumos.org