An unexpected triumph. Photo: Getty
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Israeli election: surprise victory for Binyamin Netanyahu's Likud party

Although polls suggested a tight race, Israel's Prime Minister has won for another term.

The leader of the Likud party, Binyamin Netanyahu, has won a surprise victory in Israel's election.

The incumbent defied the exit polls that were suggesting a dead heat between the centre-left Zionist Union and the right-wing Likud party.

After the build-up to the election showed his party trailing Zionist Union in the opinion polls, Netanyahu is now in a position to form a right-wing coalition government. He is on track to becoming Israel's longest-serving prime minister.

He has called it a "great victory" for Likud, and his party will begin negotiations immediately in the hope of forming a government within two to three weeks.

But Israel's political future remains uncertain. To snatch victory from the jaws of defeat, Netanyahu lurched to the ultra-nationalist Israeli right, making pledges that could lead to the country's relationship with the US and Europe deteriorating further.

He also promised thousands of new homes for settlers in the occupied Palestinian territories, and asserted that he would not allow the Palestinians to have their own state.

In this week's NS cover story on the Israeli elections, the BBC's Jeremy Bowen wrote:

No one who is interested in the impact of the Middle East on the rest of the world should focus solely on the turmoil in the Arab countries. The politics of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians are evolving, but the conflict remains as poisonous as ever. The lesson of history is that when it is left to fester, it becomes unstable and then explodes.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.