In pictures: Hicksville, Ohio on the eve of the election

The sleepy town at the heart of the battleground state goes to the polls today.

The sleepy town of Hicksville, Ohio, where I have been stationed, goes to the polls today with the rest of the United States.

Hicksville is a patriotic town - many houses proudly fly the stars and stripes.

Many of the houses boast the ubiquitous lawn signs outside. Josh Mandel is running for Senate for the Republicans - against the hugely popular incumbent democrat Sherrod Brown.

...but not all the yard-signs are political. This one offers "free kittens".

Hicksville is a largely affluent town - many of the houses here are large and distinguished.

This junk shop was damaged just a week ago - a truck from the grain-silo opposite rolled into the front of it, its brakes having failed.

Autumn here is beautiful - the area is known as the "rust belt" for more than just its steel industry at this time of year.

Hicksville is a largely conservative town - most of the signs are for Romney.

The town is dominated by this gigantic silo - and the railway which runs right through the town centre.

All photographs by Nicky Woolf.

Nicky Woolf is a writer for the Guardian based in the US. He tweets @NickyWoolf.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.