The cast of the West Wing reunites

"This is a disaster, it’s a catastrophe, it’s a cataclysmic event unrivalled by the likes of any calamity since the dawn of history."

It's the moment that fans of the West Wing have been waiting for ever since the show's seventh and final season ended in 2006.

The cast of Aaron Sorkin's hit political drama have reunited to make a campaign ad for Bridget Mary McCormack, who’s running on the nonpartisan ticket for Michigan’s Supreme Court. It's also aimed at raising awareness of non-partisan candidates in general, which appear on a different and often-overlooked section of the ballot.

Josh, CJ, Toby, Will, Kate, Donna, President Bartlet - they're all there, as are classic West Wing moments like the "walk and talk", Josh losing his shit a bit, CJ being the reasonable grown up one, and Martin Sheen doing that over-the-head flip thing with his jacket.

True, the "Oval Office" does look quite a lot like a random conference centre room with "The White House" stuck up on the wall, but don't let that get in the way of your enjoyment of it.

As it happens, Bridget Mary McCormack is the sister of Mary McCormack, who played Kate Harper in the show.

Hat tip to Mashable.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

RMT poised to rejoin the Labour Party

The transport union is set to vote on reaffiliation to the party, with RMT leaders backing the move.

Plans are being drawn up for the RMT (the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) to reaffiliate to the Labour Party in the wake of Jeremy Corbyn’s significant gains in the general election, the New Statesman has learnt.

The union, which represents tube drivers and other workers across the transport sector, was expelled from the Labour Party under Tony Blair after some Scottish branches voted to support the Scottish Socialist Party instead.

But the RMT endorsed both of Corbyn’s bids for the Labour leadership and its ruling national executive committee backed a Labour vote on 8 June.

Corbyn addressed the RMT’s annual general meeting in Exeter yesterday, where he was “given a hero’s welcome”, in the words of one delegate. Mick Cash, the RMT’s general secretary, praised Corbyn as the union’s “long-term friend and comrade”.

After the meeting, Steve Hedley, assistant general secretary at the RMT, posted a picture to Facebook with John McDonnell. The caption read: “With the shadow chancellor John McDonnell arguing that we should affiliate to the Labour Party after consulting fully and democratically with our members”.

The return of the RMT to Labour would be welcomed by the party leadership with open arms. And although its comparably small size would mean that the RMT would have little effect on the internal workings of Labour Party conference or its ruling NEC, its wide spread across the country could make the union a power player in the life of local Labour parties.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

0800 7318496