The cast of the West Wing reunites

"This is a disaster, it’s a catastrophe, it’s a cataclysmic event unrivalled by the likes of any calamity since the dawn of history."

It's the moment that fans of the West Wing have been waiting for ever since the show's seventh and final season ended in 2006.

The cast of Aaron Sorkin's hit political drama have reunited to make a campaign ad for Bridget Mary McCormack, who’s running on the nonpartisan ticket for Michigan’s Supreme Court. It's also aimed at raising awareness of non-partisan candidates in general, which appear on a different and often-overlooked section of the ballot.

Josh, CJ, Toby, Will, Kate, Donna, President Bartlet - they're all there, as are classic West Wing moments like the "walk and talk", Josh losing his shit a bit, CJ being the reasonable grown up one, and Martin Sheen doing that over-the-head flip thing with his jacket.

True, the "Oval Office" does look quite a lot like a random conference centre room with "The White House" stuck up on the wall, but don't let that get in the way of your enjoyment of it.

As it happens, Bridget Mary McCormack is the sister of Mary McCormack, who played Kate Harper in the show.

Hat tip to Mashable.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

Photo: Getty
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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.