Views from elsewhere

RSS

People walk past an ebola treatment centre in Monrovia, Liberia. Photo: Getty
How translators can help stem the ebola crisis
By Lori Thicke - 14 October 13:16

Ignorance about ebola can be as fatal as bodily contact with an infected person. The problem is that most information about how to prevent ebola is not available in the languages understood by the people at risk.

A student sits on the stairs at the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt an der Oder. Photo: Getty
How Germany managed to abolish university tuition fees
By Barbara Kehm - 13 October 13:51

Despite the fact that competition for funding and accountability has increased in German higher education, there is still a general consensus that it is a public system and should be state-funded.

Is the capacity for educational achievement something you can inherit? Photo: Getty
How genes can influence children’s exam results
By Eva Krapohl and Kaili Rimfeld - 07 October 12:31

Education is more than what happens passively to a child.

A woman enjoys an ice-cream during an Eid celebration fun fair in Burgess Park, London. Photo: Getty
The Myth of the Moderate Muslim
By Bina Shah - 06 October 12:47

Everyone seems to know that the moderate Muslim exists, but nobody seems to really agree on what he or she looks like, how he or she acts, behaves, what she believes in, how he or she practises.

British Muslims are twice as likely to be unemployed than the national average. Photo: Getty
Why we urgently need Islamic student loans
By Vasilis Pappas and Paul Dawson - 03 October 11:48

A major barrier to career aspirations among Muslims has been their inability to take on student (or any other) loans to fund higher study, as Shariah law prohibits predetermined interest rates.

A refugee looks at the sea from Lampedusa Island in the Mediterranean. Photo: Getty
A year of Mare Nostrum: political impotence has stranded hundreds of refugee children in Sicily
By Jamie Mackay - 03 October 10:34

Since April this year 5,000 unaccompanied children have arrived in the small Sicilian town of Augusta, fleeing war and poverty in north Africa.

A young journalist, carrying a camera and a gun, walks down a street in Aleppo, Syria. Photo: Getty
How do journalists keep themselves safe in warzones?
By Vicky Baker - 02 October 17:26

More exposure is needed on what is going on behind the scenes of foreign reporting – between the bylines, when the cameras stop rolling.

We shouldn’t fight for “gender equality”. We should fight to abolish gender
By George Gillett - 02 October 12:47

Gender is flawed – no set of social scripts will ever represent the wonderful diversity and intricacy of human behaviour. 

Gloves and boots used by those treating ebola drying. Photo: Getty
Will ebola allow the US to increase its military footprint in Africa?
By Martin Plaut - 02 October 10:05

The initiative may be more ambitious than it first appeared.

Hong Kong pro-democracy protestors gather near a ceremony marking China's 65th National Day. Photo: Getty
Hong Kong protests: Beijing is now face to face with universal suffrage promise
By Surya Deva - 01 October 10:54

The people of Hong Kong are making their voices heard as never before.

An Iraqi-Kurdish woman and her child cross the border into Turkey after fleeing Kobane. Photo: Getty
“We needed to escape before they slaughtered our girls”
By Danielle Spencer - 30 September 16:16

On 16 September, the northern Syrian town of Kobane came under siege. Since then, reports state that more than 150,000 refugees have flooded into Turkey.

Assistant referee Sian Massey has been the focus of sexist comments in the past. Photo: Getty
The chilling reality of sexism in football
By David Mooney - 30 September 14:35

While there is willingness to tackle other forms of discrimination in the sport, objectifying women is too often shrugged off as just “banter”.

Iraqi Kurds protesting against Isis. Photo: Getty
Is “democracy” nothing more than a slogan now?
By Luce Irigaray and Michael Marder - 24 September 15:37

The time has come to define and demonstrate differently what it means to be a democrat by giving the word to the citizens instead of keeping them hostage to debates between politicians.

In poverty-stricken areas of easter Afghanistan, girls are too often the ones at risk. Photo: Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images
Being a gynaecologist in Afghanistan is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world
By Horia Mosadiq - 24 September 12:56

A doctor in Afghanistan is using her medical training to provide healthcare and other support to women – at great risk to herself and her family.

Mainstream culture lacks accurate representation of sexual fluidity. Photo: Getty
Why we need Bi-Visibility Day
By Sarah Bramley - 23 September 9:40

This international awareness day aims to bring to attention the prejudices bisexual people face.

Drinks in a glass. Photo: Getty
I was raped when I was drunk. I was 14. Do you believe me, Richard Dawkins?
By Name Withheld - 19 September 13:53

I had not consented because I was not conscious enough to consent. Do you understand what that means?

The NHS was the centrepiece of the London Olympics opening ceremony. Photo: Getty
Rufus Hound: The Scotland debate showed how much voters value the NHS. But few realise how close it is to being destroyed
By Rufus Hound - 19 September 12:43

Politicians haven't told us the truth about the NHS and their plans for it for years.

Teens today.
Are my generation really as boring as everyone says?
By Jess Williams - 19 September 11:50

The Department of Health has reported a decrease in drinking, drugs and pregnancy among teenagers - but our generation has problems of its own, writes Jess Williams.

In the slums of Manila, inequality is so bad that the worst off have no chance to protest
By Paul Roy - 18 September 8:42

Independent filmmaker Paul Roy recounts his experiences in the Philippines in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

Students graduating from Liverpool John Moores University. Photo: Getty
One in four students experience unwanted sexual advances. What can we do about it?
By Toni Pearce - 15 September 11:45

Harassment is rife in UK universities – the passing the buck approach of “not on my campus” is no longer acceptable.

Audiences may no longer understand Monty Python’s Life of Brian because of the biblical references.
Why religious education is letting our children down
By Adam Dinham - 03 September 15:02

Religious illiteracy leads to an anxiety about the role of religion in the public sphere: from fear of terrorism to fear of exclusion and fear of litigation.

Cambodian Inspectors examine suspected medicine in a crowded market along Thai-Cambodian border during an inspection July 23, 2010 in Pailin province, Cambodia. Photo: Getty Images
Unregulated fake medicines are threatening the fight against diseases like malaria
By Paul Newton - 29 August 12:11

There is currently no international law or body that can organise the detection and prevention of fake medicines - and it's a critical threat to our ability to fight deadly diseases.

Israeli soldiers in front of the barrier at the Qalandiya checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem. Photo: Getty
How we grew up: an Israeli veteran on the dehumanising power of military control
By Yehuda Shaul - 29 August 11:41

Yehuda Shaul writes of how he and his friends learned to glorify power, and lost their ability to see Palestinians as people whose lives are no less valuable. Now, he and hundreds of others are working to end the occupation.

Two nuns wait on the pavement. Photo: Getty
“You’ll ruin my life”: one woman’s experience of abortion and the Catholic church
By Eva Beeching - 27 August 12:21

“Asking the nurse not to turn the ultrasound away, I saw our baby, the same size as a chickpea, and wondered how an innocent thing could ever be shameful.”

Students graduate from the University of Birmingham. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
In defence of idle students
By George Gillett - 26 August 10:21

Students graduating from university face huge debt, a difficult job market and declining starting salaries. Despite this, we shouldn’t allow education to become dominated by economics.

Conservative party conference. Photo: Getty
Angela Eagle: The Tories have broken their promises on political reform
By Angela Eagle - 23 August 10:16

David Cameron has reinforced the political power of a few big money donors and well established vested interests, argues the shadow leader of the Commons.  Now that his grassroots have taken flight he is even more reliant on the privileged few he uses his power to support.

Richard Dawkins’ tweets have caused controversy yet again. Photo: Getty
Why Richard Dawkins’ “abort it and try again” comments about Down’s syndrome babies are so harmful
By Graham Duncan - 22 August 16:02

Parents receiving a pre-natal diagnosis of Down’s syndrome are faced with an awful dilemma and need our care and support. They do not need pseudo-morality and outdated stereotypes.

Iraqi Turkmen guard a checkpoint in the northern town of Taza Khormato. Photo: Getty
Islamic State stands for the deaths of journalists and of free speech
By William Horsley - 22 August 12:59

Making a global spectacle of the murder of a western journalist carries a uniquely powerful propaganda message for the jihadists.

Students open their exam results at Winterbourne Academy, near Bristol. Photo: Matt Cardy/Getty Images
GCSE results day reveals the sinister side of social media
By George Gillett - 21 August 10:30

As students across the country receive their GCSE results, many will be realising that there is no escape from comparisons with their peers thanks to the growth of social media. But does it represent the truth?

Police watch as demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Photo: Getty
Britain should not look at the militarised police in Ferguson and congratulate itself
By Harry Leslie Smith - 21 August 9:55

The UK may not have a police force that is equipped like an army, but through our arms trade we export death to some of the most volatile regions of the world. It has to stop.

Pages