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Children playing the violin.
Deal with it, parents: Violin lessons are pointless
By Mark Oppenheimer - 18 September 13:25

Parents who drag their children through music and dance lessons in order to give them skills for life, are wasting their time. Such lessons are pointless - but that needn't be a bad thing.

New Statesman
The march that made Gandhi the Mahatma
By Martin Plaut - 17 September 13:33

One hundred years ago, Gandhi launched the decisive 1913 campaign that was to transform him into a figure of international stature. Later this year, we commemorate it.

Have you ever met a woman in a niqab? Has one ever harmed you?
By Aisha Gani - 17 September 9:43

As politicians call for a "national debate" on the niqab, Aisha Gani speaks to women who choose to wear a full-face veil to discover why they do so.

High street.
Crap Towns is nothing but an exercise in laughing at neglect
By Daniel Gray - 16 September 11:57

Why don't we love our neglected towns? When he returned to England to research his latest book, author Daniel Gray found the country's towns a haven of the beautiful and bizarre.

Why are we still relying on decades-old stereotypes when we talk about the Middle East?
By Samira Shackle - 13 September 11:49

Media narratives and the stereotypes they employ matter because they frame the way the world understands events. The reporting of Middle Eastern conflicts has the potential power to impact western political responses.

New Statesman
Inequality reaches a record high in the US, but which countries are worst off?
By Sophie McBain - 13 September 11:07

Five years after Lehman Brother's collapse, one group has fared spectacularly well: the richest 1 per cent. The world's superpower is now worryingly dependent on the financial fortunes of just 1.35m taxpayers. But where in the world is inequality the grea

New Statesman
The divided town of Deir Ezzour is a microcosm of Syria’s bitter conflict
By Donatella Rovera - 12 September 7:49

As the threat of military intervention continues to loom over Syria, in a far-flung corner of the country, the town of Deir Ezzour offers an insight into the suffering of ordinary Syrians.

New Statesman
The gay taboo in Nigeria: "I don't lose sight of the struggle"
By Alan White - 11 September 14:00

It’s now nearly nine years since Bisi Alimi made the decision to come out as gay on national Nigerian television. He hasn't stopped fighting since.

New Statesman
A quarter of men in Asia-Pacific admit rape
By Sophie McBain - 10 September 10:14

A UN survey of 10,000 men in Asia-Pacific reveals high levels of sexual violence in the region, and asks why rape is so common.

New Statesman
The 'stranger danger' message isn't protecting our children from abuse
By @EVB_Now - 09 September 15:35

We need to teach children how to differentiate between threatening situations and threatening people, whether those people are familiar or not.

A girl flys her kite in the Olympic park in Munich, southern Germany
Judicial Review is not part of a vast left wing conspiracy
By Adam Wagner - 09 September 15:24

It is surely no surprise that when there is a predominantly right-wing government, those not in power will use other means to challenge government decisions - that is not necessarily a bad thing.

New Statesman
The British countryside has always been an extended theme park for the rich
By Rachel McCormack - 09 September 14:48

My Glaswegian father won't be celebrating the Glorious Twelfth, but the Scottish economy depends on moneyed tourists shooting grouse in a stylised countryside idyll.

New Statesman
Banning Khat is one of the most dangerous decisions made during the 'war on drugs'
By Jon Manning - 09 September 11:38

Khat has been part of Somali, Yemeni and Ethiopian culture for hundreds of years. In banning the substance, Theresa May runs a very real risk of creating violence and organised crime.

A policy of banning all sex in prison will not work
By Michael Amherst - 09 September 9:25

A blanket ban on sex in prison leads to prisoners failing to report rape or sexual assault for fear of punishment.

'Queer' is so much more than what's found in the theory books.
Queer is the question
By Nayla Ziadeh - 08 September 10:25

‘Queer’ is not something that ever stays still; it is transient and, in that sense, in a constant state of becoming.

Mickey Rooney playing a Japanese landlord in Breakfast at Tiffany's.
"Yellowface" is funny, according to a bevy of non-east Asians
By Anh Chu - 08 September 10:04

No matter the degree, racism hurts, regresses and divides, but it needn't conquer.

After Egypt and Syria, there's never been a worse time to host an arms fair
By David Wearing - 07 September 13:58

Next week London hosts the world’s largest arms fair, the "Defence Security Equipment International" (DSEi) exhibition, organised with the help of the British government and part-subsidised by the UK taxpayer.

Caroline Criado-Perez, right, on the day of the banknote announcement. Getty
Have the police failed to record the Twitter threats against me?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 05 September 17:57

Police officers told Caroline Criado-Perez that they would collate the necessary information on threatening tweets sent to her. But earlier today, she was told that only individual tweets she had reported were being investigated. She now wonders if it is

Spirit
Has the time come for self-destructing tweets?
By Siraj Datoo - 05 September 14:03

A new service for twitter lets you add a snapchat-like timer to tweets. Is this what we need to get people to take privacy seriously, asks Siraj Datoo?

Did we all go out of our minds on transfer deadline day?
By Martin Cloake - 04 September 10:27

It is obscene and absurd — but Martin Cloake can't stop watching.

Caroline Criado-Perez (r) with Mary Macleod, Mark Carney and Stella Creasy
Caroline Criado-Perez's speech on cyber-harassment at the Women's Aid conference
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 04 September 9:07

"If there’s one thing I want to come out of what happened to me, it’s for the phrase “don’t feed the trolls” to be scrubbed from the annals of received wisdom."

The Telegraph needs a non-sexist approach to promoting sex-ed
By Zoe Margolis - 03 September 17:54

Clare Perry's campaign for a porn filter might undermine her support for better sex ed, writes Zoe Margolis.

Ethiopia and Kenya help dismember Somalia
By Martin Plaut - 03 September 10:42

A new deal has recognised Jubaland, a strip of land in southern Somalia and bordering on Kenya and Ethiopia, as yet another quasi-independent entity in the region.

Annette Ashby, the first woman to be elected to the Society of Engineers
Get more women into tech? My colleagues never got the memo
By Tina Amirtha - 03 September 10:20

Forget the motivational media campaigns - Tina Amirtha explains what it's really like to be a female engineer in a male-dominated profession.

Don't be sniffy about "Mumsnet Feminism"
By Hannah Mudge - 01 September 10:56

Anyone sneering at Mumsnet as a forum for feminist discussion probably hasn't visited the site very much, says Hannah Mudge.

The many faces of India
By Asiya Islam - 30 August 15:41

The idea that India is "the rape capital of the world" needs to be challenged but without refusing women's experience of fear and violence.

India has to make the fight against rape something that cannot be ignored
By Monisha Rajesh - 29 August 15:19

Every time a high-profile rape case occurs in India, there is shock, outrage and protests, but nothing actually changes.

What it's like to be an ugly feminist
By Emma Burnell - 28 August 11:27

I have been told I am “too ugly to rape” and “too fat to live”. We must remember to take into account those of us for whom the very lack of objectification is used as a weapon against us.

Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial
Martin Luther King and the African-American fight for justice
By Bonnie Greer - 28 August 9:10

From fairly early on, the Civil Rights Movement, in many instances, was a carefully managed affair. Bonnie Greer examines the role of the black middle class in the Civil Rights Movement and the March on Washington.

Dear Jamie Oliver, poverty isn't picturesque by the Mediterranean either
By Rachel McCormack - 27 August 16:18

The TV chef's remarks that "You go to Italy or Spain and they eat well on not much money" reveals a startling ignorance about what life is really like in Italy or Spain for those without much money.

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