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Thai police stand guard outside a military compound before former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra arrives to report to Thailand's ruling military. Photo: Getty
Myths that have kept Thailand together now risk tearing it apart following military coup
By Matthew Phillips - 23 May 13:15

The danger now is that myth, not sense, will come to define Thai citizenship in the wake of the army’s latest intervention.

A still from the Fosters "Good Call!" advert on YouTube.
The real problem men face today is not the rise of women
By Edward Smith - 22 May 15:37

Men worry about feminism, as if a culture of women's rights is about to stamp out male identity. But really, it's men who are their own worst enemies.

Model Lily Cole, seen here in 2012, aged 24, was scouted at the age of 14. Photo: Getty
Children’s bodies in adult clothes: fashion’s love affair with youth and size zero
By Harriet Williamson - 22 May 13:55

Why - even though fashion is aimed at adult women - does it use teenage models? Is it because their bodies are more child-like - or because they are more compliant? 

Flats and shacks on the outskirts of Cape Town. Photo: Getty
Fighting Cape Town’s notorious gangs
By Martin Plaut - 22 May 12:19

Martin Plaut meets the man taking on the gangs that are said to be responsible for 80 per cent of Cape Town’s crime.

Financial abuse is now a well-recognised feature of domestic violence. Photo: Getty
Child maintenance changes: is it right to give abusive fathers another weapon against their partners?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 21 May 15:47

Single parents – 95 per cent of whom are women – who have failed to reach an “amicable” agreement with their estranged partners over child maintenance stand to lose financially under new government policy.

Mourners gather during the funeral procession of Mahmud al-Sayed al-Dakruri on 20 May. Photo: Getty
By trying to control civil society, the Egyptian government could fuel more social unrest
By Adam Pickering - 21 May 10:27

The leaders in Egypt have repeatedly failed to recognise that the campaigning of not-for-profits plays an important role as a pressure gauge that can release dissent in a manageable way.

The flag of South Sudan was raised at the UN for the first time in July 2011. Photo: Getty
“This is one of the worst places in the world to be a woman”
By John Plastow - 21 May 10:06

Three years on from the signing of the peace agreement in South Sudan, the heady optimism has disappeared.

Feminist protest. Photo: Getty
What’s driving the new sexism?
By Alison Phipps - 19 May 14:11

The combination of age-old forms of misogyny with contemporary free-market heartlessness has resulted in the perfect breeding ground for the most brutal types of bullying.

A contestant in a beauty pageant. Photo: Getty
Rebecca Reilly-Cooper on Naomi Wolf: How the beautiful are damned
By Rebecca Reilly-Cooper - 16 May 9:38

Naomi Wolf's anger is animated by the question: how much more could talented, ambitious women achieve, if they could only free themselves from the chains of beauty?

Beyonce has been criticised by bell hooks. Photo: Getty Images
Is bell hooks right to call Beyoncé a terrorist?
By Claire Hynes - 15 May 14:43

Writer and theorist bell hooks has labelled Beyoncé a “terrorist” for how she chooses to appear in her music videos – illuminating one of the thorniest debates in feminism. 

Judith Butler believed we were all performing gender. Photo: Getty
Caroline Criado-Perez on Judith Butler: What's a phallus got to do with it?
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 15 May 11:12

In the late 80s, a new theorist emerged on the scene. She was called Judith Butler, and she was to revolutionise gender theory so fundamentally, that to write a paper on gender in the 21st century that does not at least reference Butler, is to almost place yourself outside of theoretical intelligibility.

Irigaray wanted to unlock the female imagination. Photo: Getty
Jane Clare Jones on Luce Irigaray: The murder of the mother
By Jane Clare Jones - 14 May 17:26

Luce Irigaray's public image consists largely of the fact that she once said something unfathomably silly about E=mc2 being a "sexed equation". But there is far more to her than that.

Audre Lorde directed her critical attention within movements for justice. Photo: Getty
Nathifa Greene on Audre Lorde: Dismantling the master’s house
By Nathifa Greene - 14 May 9:05

As a black lesbian feminist, Audre Lorde fought both white supremacy in the feminist movement, and misogyny among civil rights campaigners. 

A protester outside the Egyptian embassy in Paris. Photo: Getty
Marina Strinkovsky on Shulamith Firestone: The forgotten firebrand
By Marina Strinkovsky - 13 May 9:56

Shulamith Firestone's The Dialectic of Sex was a bestseller; an almost unimaginable feat for a book that called pregnancy barbaric, childhood a segregationist institution and heterosexual love “the pivot of women’s oppression”. 

Romanian women protest against domestic violence. Photo: Getty
Sian Norris on Marilyn French: Violence runs like an ugly vein through our society
By Sian Norris - 13 May 9:35

Marilyn French’s novel The Women's Room is a frank and unflinching portrayal of the violence done to women in a society that doesn’t value them as fully human. Forty years on, that violence still exists.

Germaine Greer. Photo: Getty
Melody Saracoglu on Germaine Greer: One Woman Against the World
By Melody Saracoglu - 12 May 15:35

Many criticisms of feminist analysis involve the complaint that questions were asked that never got answered - or a damning indictment was exposed, with little in the way of remedial action suggested. The Female Eunuch cannot be accused of this.

Phoenix night: Conchita Wurst holds her trophy aloft after winning Eurovision 2014: Photo: © Andres Putting (EBU)
Eurovision: A continent divided in sexual attitudes – or perhaps not?
By Alan Renwick - 12 May 12:49

Anti-gay petitions ahead of the contest suggested eastern countries would give winner Conchita Wurst nul points. But while their juries’ votes reflected this, public votes were encouragingly pro-Wurst. 

A view of London's skyline. Photo: Getty
Is perseverance the key to coping as an LGBT employee?
By Jo Lloyd - 09 May 13:29

There is evidence to suggest that a high level of psychological flexibility, something LGBT employees often need to develop at work, can help people cope better, and indeed flourish, in the workplace.

Two people accompanying a person in a wheelchair. Photo: Getty
Two-thirds of us are uncomfortable talking to disabled people: we need time, money and effort to get over the awkwardness
By Frances Ryan - 08 May 9:36

According to new research by disability charity Scope out today, 67 per cent of people feel uncomfortable when talking to a disabled person. This awkwardness stems from ignorance and fear, and the awkward truth is we'll need time, money and whole lot of effort to change attitudes.

Rupert Everett in Soho. Photograph: William Baker/Channel 4
Rupert Everett’s prostitution documentary, Love for Sale, seeks fantasy not reality
By Meghan Murphy - 05 May 17:58

In reality, prostitution is not the world’s oldest profession – it is one of the world’s oldest oppressions. 

A woman holds a placard aloft during a Slutwalk march in Melbourne, Australia. Photo: Getty
We live in a culture riddled with rape-supportive beliefs about consent
By Jane Clare Jones - 02 May 11:52

The comments by the judge in the case of Adam Hulin, who was last week convicted on two counts of sexual assault, demonstrate that the judiciary still seems to have enormous problems wrapping its head around the personhood of women and girls.

Chris Grayling is the first politically-appointed Lord Chancellor who has never been a lawyer. Photo: Getty
Operation Cotton and the 23 pages which skewered Chris Grayling’s legal aid reforms
By Adam Wagner - 02 May 10:12

A judge has halted a high-profile fraud trial after the defendants were left unrepresented because of legal aid cuts.

World Bank Vice President for the Africa Region Obiageli Ezekwesili delivers a speech. Photo: Getty
Why is there such a culture of misinformation surrounding the case of Nigeria’s kidnapped girls?
By Emma Dabiri - 01 May 14:54

The tragedy of the two hundred girls kidnapped in Nigeria won’t be as high-profile a story as individual western kidnap victims – and the Nigerian authorities aren’t helping.

Two hands wearing wedding rings. Photo: Getty
Why I refuse to get married until we have equality on the certificate
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 01 May 11:49

Marriage certificates only include your father’s name – to reinvent marriage as a twenty-first century institution, this must change.

Corpus Christi Catholic College pupils make their way home passing tributes to teacher Ann Maguire. Photo: Getty
The stabbing of Ann Maguire was not an isolated incident – it’s part of a trend of fatal male violence against women
By Karen Ingala Smith - 01 May 10:41

The murder of Leeds teacher should Ann Maguire should horrify and upset us, but no more or less than the killings of the other 49 women in the UK this year before her.

Tony Blair with some of the 100 new Labour women MPs elected in the 1997 general election. Photo: Getty
It’s 2014 – yet media and politics is still a man’s game

An archival study of newspaper coverage of female MPs since 1992 has revealed that the way women in politics are covered by our press is getting worse, not better.

His and hers mugs sit on the side of a swimming pool. Photo: cart_wheels on Flicker, via Creative Commons
Screw the fairy tale, it’s time to rethink monogamy
By Helen Croydon - 24 April 15:10

The current model of lifelong, cohabiting monogamous partnership has never been such an outdated ideal.

The singer Tulisa Contostavlos took action against an ex-boyfriend for releasing a sex tape after their break-up. Photo: Getty
Revenge porn has become too profitable to go away
By Gordon Fletcher - 24 April 12:25

The constant presence of digital technology in our lives is commercially profitable but at the cost of what we understand to be “private”.

Holy trinity: English triplet babies are held by their grandmother, vicar and mother following their christening, 1942. Photo: Getty
The World’s Toughest Job may or may not be being a mother
By Amy Hawkins - 23 April 11:04

Being a mother is hard – but we don’t need a greetings card company to tell us that.

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