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MailOnline is “the benchmark of anonymous bullying, abuse and grammatically incorrect barbs”.
“Your family are losers and your children are adopted”: what it’s like to write for MailOnline
By Grant Feller - 09 July 11:17

Grant Feller thought he knew what he was getting into when he wrote about his new life as a stay-at-home dad for MailOnline – but the vileness of the response surpassed his wildest expectations.

A smear test can trap a survivor in unstoppable and violent memories. Photo: Getty
Why rape survivors often refuse cervical smears - even if it risks their lives
By Pavan Amara - 08 July 15:29

Cervical smear tests aren’t just stressful for rape survivors – they can trigger powerful flashbacks and violent memories. But avoiding a test can mean preserving your mental health at the risk of your physical well-being.

Rising cities.
If you want to go to university, you’re better off poor in London than rich anywhere else
By Haf Davies - 07 July 13:00

Reports show that London schools are outperforming the rest of the country. And it’s not just London - the “city effect” is improving results in Birmingham and Manchester too.

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt. Photo: Getty
Diagnosing cancer: why shaming and blaming GPs isn’t about improving patient safety
By Jonathon Tomlinson - 01 July 13:58

Cancer very often presents in ways we don’t expect. Creating a culture of fear around diagnosis isn’t a good thing.

How exactly is England hurt by Scottish independence? Photo: Getty
Wise up England, you’d be better off without Scotland
By Bryan Glass - 01 July 11:14

There are several powerful reasons why the English should accept or even be enthusiastic about the Scots going it alone when they vote at the end of the summer.

What is cyberbullying?
What is cyberbullying?
By Aoife Moriarty - 01 July 10:33

Cyberbullying became a major subject last year after a number of teen suicides linked to social network Ask.fm. But what is it, and how can we prevent young people from abusing each other online?

Rebekah Brooks arriving at the Old Bailey in May 2014. Photo: Getty
The presumption of innocence: why we shouldn’t assume it was wrong to charge Rebekah Brooks
By Carl Gardner - 25 June 10:13

The gap between accusation and guilt is not a bug in our criminal justice: it’s a necessary and desirable feature.

A woman holds a banner as she takes part in a "slut walk" in London in 2012. Photo: Getty
Nigel Evans and Ben Sullivan are wrong: rape suspects should not be given anonymity
By Willard Foxton - 24 June 15:24

From 1976 until 1988, both sides in sexual cases had anonymity. The Thatcher government – not generally known for its strong stand on women’s rights – repealed it, because it had appalling consequences.

The welfare of sex workers themselves needs to be the prime concern. Photo: Getty
The biggest myths about street-based sex work
By Clare Jones - 23 June 10:27

No, not all prostitutes get paid loads - and they're aren't all on drugs or from Eastern Europe. To make better policy around street-based sex work, we must first understand the reality of what it involves.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Getty
The Sudanese dictatorship: twenty-five years of impunity
By Martin Plaut - 20 June 12:50

Once, the plight of Darfur’s two million refugees would have made front page news. Today they seldom make even a paragraph in the inside pages of British broadsheets, although the repression continues unabated.

The Heygate Estate is being reduced to rubble. Photo: Sophie Foster
Sanitised nostalgia won’t bring back the communities destroyed to make way for luxury flats
By Sophie Foster - 20 June 12:22

The new “regeneration” in places like Elephant and Castle in south London destroys social housing, and then invites those who have been forced out to help “preserve” the history and culture of the area.

Particularly hard hit are mothers whose partners have been abusive towards them. Photo: Getty
Mothers4Justice: why we need a single mothers’ pressure group
By Ann Carlton - 17 June 11:58

Thanks to the success of the fathers’ campaigns, public policy is now biased against responsible mothers.

The rude intrusion of current affairs exposed the limitations of the summit. Photo: Foreign Office on Flickr
Is this the beginning of the end of the war on women’s bodies?
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 17 June 10:55

The recent summit in London has grabbed headlines, but whether we have now reached a turning point in the fight to end sexual violence in conflict remains to be seen.

The pills can solve your problem, while not really solving it at all. Photo: Getty
What happens when you go to the doctor and say you can’t get an erection
By David Vernon - 17 June 9:18

It is estimated that only a third of men with erectile dysfunction seek treatment. This is what happens if you do.

Resplendent in high boots, leather and latex, the dominatrix continues to influence trendsetters. Photo: Getty
How the Nordic Model will close the door on the professional dominatrix
By Margaret Corvid - 16 June 16:21

Under the Nordic Model – which criminalises the clients of sex workers – the role of the dominatrix, which is as classically British as that of a steam train conductor, will be greatly changed and diminished.

Taking control of the divorce can be a way of taking control of the situation. Photo: Keonl Cabral / Flickr / Creative Commons
Why I chose to write the Bad Wife’s Guide to Divorce
By Emma Burnell - 16 June 11:46

To get what I wanted from my divorce, I had to be tough and demanding – things women are constantly told we must not be.

The UN special envoy Angelina Jolie speaking at the summit. Photo: Getty
The End Sexual Violence in Conflict summit is a chance to stop the female body being a battleground
By Aisha Gill - 12 June 15:21

International humanitarian law needs to include serious redress for those using rape as a method of conflict.

Nia Sanchez, winner of Miss USA 2014, is a black belt in taekwondo and has suggested women learn to defend themselves. Photo: Getty
Suggesting women learn self-defence is the opposite of victim-blaming
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 11 June 12:54

In a perfect world, no woman would need to defend herself from attack. But until that world arrives, learning self-defence is a solution that defies the patriarchy’s attempt to impose passivity and blame on women.

In Turkey, Erdoğan's attempt to block Twitter lasted barely two weeks. Photo: Getty
Social media has been privatised. Why do we treat it as a public space?
By Jillian C York - 11 June 12:15

Social media companies like Twitter and Facebook have essentially erected new borders where such borders did not exist before.

A march for transgender equality at Madrid Pride in 2010. Photo: Getty
It’s time to end divisive rhetoric on sex and gender and create a trans-inclusive feminism
By Tim R Johnston - 10 June 19:08

Sheila Jeffreys’s new book, Gender Hurts: A Feminist Analysis of the Politics of Transgenderism, is a divisive and poorly-researched work. But it provides an opportunity to leave the divisive rhetoric behind, and create a truly trans-inclusive feminism.

England captain Charlotte Edwards poses with the Women's Ashes trophy in Australia in February. Photo: Getty
Why is the media still erasing women’s achievement in sport?
By Carrie Dunn - 10 June 15:15

Within sport, women athletes are finally gaining the professional recognition they deserve. Yet the media continues to assume that “the England team” is shorthand for “the men’s team”.  

Wedding rings. Photo: Firemedic58 on Flickr, via Creative Commons
Equality on marriage certificates will be worth every penny
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 09 June 16:42

Every single instance of inequality is worthy of our time, and compared to other things the government chooses to spend our money on, £1.5m is a small price to pay for it.

An inmate peers from behind a wall as a guard walks by in the infamous Evin jail. Photo: Getty
For the Bahá'ís imprisoned in Iran, freedom and human rights seem remote
By Nazila Ghanea - 06 June 10:09

Seven Bahá'ís – members of Iran’s largest non-Muslim religious minority, persecuted by the government for decades – have now spent six years in prison for practising their religion.

Juan Carlos I in Mallorca in 2011. Photo: Getty
Can Spain's monarchy survive the abdication of Juan Carlos I?
By Fernando Rosell-Aguilar - 03 June 10:14

The smooth succession from father to son was put in doubt after thousands of people took to the streets to call for a referendum on the future of the monarchy.

Graduate prospects are rising, but for some it's too late
Graduate prospects are improving, but some may already have left Britain for good
By Lucy Fisher - 02 June 17:04

The UK's graduate job market is getting better, but Britain may already have lost a selection of its most talented youth to foreign climes.

ATTARD, MALTA - MAY 21: England celebrate after winning the UEFA Under 17 European Championship 2014 final against Netherlands (Photo by Sascha Steinbach/Bongarts/Getty Images)
England’s schoolboy success only adds to sense of confusion
By Cameron Sharpe - 29 May 15:50

Were FA’s ‘old school’ methods the right approach all along?

A placard from a 2008 human rights protest in Karachi, Pakistan. Photo: Getty
The stoning of Farzana P
By Bina Shah - 28 May 15:07

The death of a 25-year-old pregnant woman at the hands of her family was not an “honour killing”. It was murder.

Football stand. Photo: Getty
Punk football: how the rise of fan ownership could save the sport
By Martin Cloake - 28 May 10:58

A new book charting and questioning the rise of football's supporter governance movement predicts a bright future for fan ownership of football clubs.

What happens to your town once a far-right party comes to power?
By Philip and James Kleinfeld - 27 May 15:05

In March’s local elections, the French far-right party the Front National took control of new towns in the rust-belts of the north and south. What has changed there since they came to power?

A mother walks her children to school. Photo: Getty
Down the rabbit hole: single parenthood in austerity Britain
By Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi - 27 May 10:55

The government’s punitive measures have made it harder to get out of poverty. And austerity is making it worse.

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