Views from elsewhere

RSS

The government is building a network of spies to make immigrants' lives impossible
By Asiya Islam - 17 May 10:16

Just try renting a house on a valid student visa after the latest proposals go through.

A nurse walks with children outside an orphanage and hospital in Addis Ababa.
10 per cent of the world uses 90 per cent of the morphine: this needs to change
By Sheila Payne - 16 May 10:23

Pain relief and palliative care is a human right - and yet global access to drugs is grossly unequal. Change is urgently needed.

My mother didn’t have any say in her divorce - I did.
In a generation, everything has changed for British Muslim women
By Irna Qureshi - 15 May 17:33

My mother and I both married men from Pakistan. Both marriages ended in divorce, but their circumstances and our attitudes towards them could not have been more different: it is a sign of how much has changed.

New Statesman
The Oxford abuse case and the myth of the “good girl” victim
By Aisha Gill - 15 May 16:48

It is widely believed that ‘true’ victims are always happy and willing to co-operate with the authorities and that ‘good girls’ would never accept payment for their own exploitation and that they would always contrive to escape such situations. That's not

Toronto Pride.
Israel row: The bid to defund Toronto LGBT Pride is straightforward censorship
By Peter Tatchell - 15 May 12:17

The bid to ban pro-Palestine group Queers Against Israeli Apartheid as well as the slogan “Israeli apartheid” is a direct attack on freedom of speech and the right to protest.

On the Thames estuary
By Caroline Crampton - 15 May 10:42

"The estuary doesn’t yield all its secrets on first glance. An hour or so out from the Isle of Sheppey, we arrive at seven bizarre constructions that look as if they belong in War of the Worlds..."

Zimbabwean Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai and his wife Elizabeth Tsvangirai.
On the fifth anniversary of Tonderai Ndira's death, how much has changed in Zimbabwe?
By Mark Olden - 14 May 15:38

Amid all the bloodshed of Zimbabwe’s 2008 election, it was the murder of the 30-year-old Tonderai Ndira that caught the international media’s attention. He became a symbol for the country's political struggles. Five years on, Zimbabwe is transformed, but

New Statesman
The irony of the press criticising Michael Gove's dodgy surveys
By Michael Marshall - 14 May 12:28

Most PR-commissioned surveys are bunk – but it's not just Michael Gove who cites them.

Stephen Hawking is right, it's time to end international support for Israeli impunity
By Rafeef Ziadah - 11 May 13:11

As long as Israel can count on a blank cheque from the international community, it will continue to displace more Palestinians and further abuse and curtail their rights.

Wigan Athletic training ahead of the FA Cup Final.
Does the FA Cup still matter?
By Martin Cloake - 10 May 17:03

Where once the TV schedule was built around the unfolding spectacle, now the game is scheduled to fit in with TV. The fans are corralled and the players know that staying in the moneyed land of the Premiership is a greater prize than lifting the cup.

The Leveson Report.
The press denied readers the facts over Leveson
By Martin Moore - 09 May 15:50

Was ours "a free and open marketplace of information"? Not even close, says Martin Moore of the Media Standards Trust.

Sorry, Stephen Hawking, but a boycott of Israel isn't the answer
By Matt Hill - 09 May 14:22

A general boycott plays into the hands of Israel's hard-right leaders. Instead, we should punish firms and institutions that operate in the Occupied Territories.

We shouldn't let the Home Secretary load the dice over human rights
By Adam Wagner - 08 May 16:29

There is no justification for the new immigration bill – and it's a move guaranteed to harm unpopular minorities, writes Adam Wagner.

Making your employees wear a uniform is trying to blend them into sameness and insignificance
By Sarah Ditum - 08 May 14:41

Stay strong, women of Virgin: no one should have the power to dictate your underwear, says Sarah Ditum.

After Kenya, the UK must compensate the other victims of empire
By Peter Tatchell - 08 May 14:10

Britain should offer similar redress for its bloody colonial wars in Malaya, Aden, Cyprus and the north of Ireland.

The UK doesn't provide enough medical care for some – and too much for others
By Margaret McCartney - 02 May 14:28

Doctors and patients need to question unnecessary procedures, writes Dr Margaret McCartney.

The scars you don't see: what it's like to live with PTSD
By Willard Foxton - 02 May 11:13

I didn’t break down instantly. It was at least a month before I had the first dream where I woke up, safe in my bed, but sheeted in sweat, scared to go back to sleep.

The One Barnet case heralds local government’s disappearing act
By Reema Patel and Sarah Sackman - 01 May 16:58

This is a future vision of local government where councils are reduced to mere technocratic commissioning bodies.

Domestic violence and mental illness: "I have honestly never felt so alone in my life"
By Faridah Newman - 01 May 11:17

Domestic violence, especially related to an intimate partner, is inextricably connected to mental illness. Faridah Newman explains how mental illness can often represent a vulnerability which is exploited by abusive partners.

Giving think tanks a direct policy role is good for democracy
By Peter Cuthbertson - 01 May 9:47

Excluding think tanks of left, right or centre from the policy process is undemocratic as well as impossibly naïve.

Kick the racism out of football, don't kick out the discussion of racism
By Musa Okwonga - 01 May 9:24

Reginald D Hunter's set at the Professional Footballers' Association awards dinner, and the response to it, shines a light on one of the great linguistic arm-wrestles of our time.

The "snooper's charter" showed just what the Government is capable of
By Dr Richard Clayton - 30 April 9:40

The proposed "Filter" programme would have been a vast step up in terms of the state's ability to spy on its citizens.

Jason Collins: “I'm a 34-year-old NBA center. I'm black. And I'm gay."
By Paolo Bandini - 30 April 8:32

The media storm surrounding NBA centre Jason Collins coming out shows the sporting world is ready to hear what he has to say.

Why any tax avoidance "clampdown" is a ridiculous game of whack-a-mole
By Willard Foxton - 29 April 16:24

Danny Alexander's "mansion tax lite" has been torpedoed by oligarchs claiming their £2m+ properties are "open to the public". It shows how hard it is to stop the rich - and their lawyers - finding creative ways to beat the taxman.

Think that Royal Mail is bad? Wait until you see its privatised successors
By Paul Mills - 29 April 13:47

The important task of getting crucial and confidential letters to people on time is jeopardised by profit-oriented thinking that prioritises getting postmen back to the depot to meet targets.

Argentina’s farewell to Margaret Thatcher
By Elizabeth Yentumi - 29 April 12:20

Reactions to her death quickly turned from the personal to the political.

New Statesman
Owner of collapsed factory caught at Bangladesh-India border
By Alex Hern - 29 April 11:30

Sohel Rana arrested trying to flee the country.

Sleeping Girl.
The darkness beyond language
By Rebecca Wait - 29 April 9:38

A novelist's account of depression and the struggle to find words to describe it.

The "better off on benefits than in work" claim is a complete fallacy - where's the evidence?
By Mark Serwotka - 29 April 8:54

The real issue for the government is not making work pay, but making work exist, says the PCS union's Mark Serwotka.

Pages