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Moeen Ali wielding the bat for England in Bangladesh earlier this year. Photo: Gareth Copley/Getty Images
Could cricketer Moeen Ali be the saviour of multiculturalism in Britain?
By Harcharan Chandhoke - 05 August 11:23

Moeen Ali has shown it is possible to be both a devoutly practising Muslim and a ‎loyal participating citizen of Britain. There is no contradiction at all between the two.

Putin is in international disgrace - the west must make him feel it
Any financial loss to Britain mustn’t obscure the aim of sanctions on Russia
By Robert Macquarie - 04 August 13:19

The cost of recent economic sanctions will be felt in the west, but it’s a cost we can – and should – withstand. 

Outside the Matchroom Stadium. Photo: Getty
It’s not you, Leyton Orient: why a sexist song means I’m walking away from my football club
By James McMahon - 01 August 14:47

After tweeting his disapproval of a sexist song sung in the stands, James McMahon found himself on the receiving end of a social media onslaught.

Studies show that animal agriculture causes between 10 and 25 per cent of global greenhouse gases. Photo: Getty
Why I’m a vegetarian – it’s a matter of statistics, not sentiment
By Haf Davies - 01 August 14:14

The traditional reasons, animal welfare and (to lesser extent) a healthier diet, are now joined by concerns for the environment.

NHS staff at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
The UK’s mental health care is in crisis – the next government must act urgently
By George Gillett - 01 August 10:59

Mentally ill patients forced to travel hundreds of miles for treatment, forcible sectioning in order to get beds and medical students begging for greater teaching on psychiatry: we're not getting it right

Hong Kong's citizens remain determined to achieve democratic values for their city. Photo: Anthony Kwan/Stringer/Getty Images
The fight for democracy and liberty in Hong Kong
By Robert Macquarie - 31 July 17:59

Chinese pressure on the city's government is pushing the situation into dangerous territory.

Smoke rises from a building hit by an Israeli air strike on 25 July.
Tomorrow the war ends: diary of a writer in Gaza City
By Najlaa Ataallah - 31 July 15:48

“Although I ask my family what date it is every day, and I look it up myself whenever I can, I always forget within a few short moments.”

Doctors prepare to treat patients in Guinea, one of the countries affected by the Ebola outbreak
Ebola panic reveals the balancing act between patient freedom and social safety
By George Gillett - 30 July 16:27

As the Ebola crisis in West Africa has shown, the conflict between society's best interests and a patient's own wishes can often be controversial.

A picture taken from the Israeli border shows the sun setting over the Gaza strip. Photo: Getty
A reply to Jason Cowley on Gaza
By Prof Alan Johnson - 30 July 14:08

Alan Johnson responds to the NS editor’s article about Israel, Gaza and the left.

We don’t have the language to reflect the diversity and breadth of connections we experience. Photo: Getty
Isn’t it time we admitted we’re all a bit polyamorous?
By Rosie Wilby - 30 July 11:06

Monogamy is rare, no matter what we might tell ourselves. We need a new currency of commitment.

Those killed in Operation Protective Edge are remembered at the rally in Tel Aviv. Photo: Getty
“Jews and Arabs refuse to be enemies”: what it’s like to be an anti-war Israeli
By Marina Strinkovsky - 30 July 10:18

Pacifism has attracted a social penalty in Israeli society for decades – many Israelis are immersed in a siege mentality, cynically whipped up at critical moments by their self-serving leadership. But a small anti-war movement clings on.

A nurse with bottles of medicine. Photo: Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images
David Tredinnick's right that alternative medicine could work - but that's not reason to embrace it
By George Gillett - 29 July 16:08

Our understanding of placebo-based treatments suggests that alternative medicine could benefit patients. But the impact on medical ethics could lead to unintended consequences.

Gazans are suffering, says resident Ghada Al Kord. Photo: Alison Baskerville, CARE
Letter from Gaza: “You cannot understand how it feels... There is no dignity”
By Ghada Al Kord - 25 July 13:35

Palestinian Ghada Al Kord tells of the difficulties of navigating a warzone while pregnant and the indignity of being trapped in Gaza. 

A memorial to French victims of domestic violence. Photo: Getty
"Isolated incidents": how the laws around domestic violence are failing its victims
By Caroline Criado-Perez - 23 July 10:42

An investigation into the murder of Natalie Esack by her estranged husband reveals it followed a campaign of terror waged by a man who could not countenance finally losing control over his victim. But police and prosecutors can only respond to individuals threats and acts of violence. It's time for a change in the law.

John Kerry.
How John Kerry built a peace process for Israel-Palestine, then watched it burn
By Ben Birnbaum and Amir Tibon - 21 July 15:09

Extensive, behind-the-scenes reporting on the Israel-Palestine peace deal that almost was.

Along with millions of other gay Indians, last year I became a criminal overnight
By Pallav Patankar - 18 July 12:15

Laws like India's Section 377, which condemns gay sex as "unnatural", exist in 42 countries across the Commonwealth. It's time to repeal them.

A shopper leaves an Abercrombie & Fitch store in London. Photo: Getty
Model workers: The clothes shops that only hire beautiful people
By Harriet Williamson - 18 July 8:45

The likes of American Apparel and Abercrombie & Fitch expect their sales staff to conform to a narrow conception of beauty, sometimes even calling them "models" so they can reject those whose faces don't fi.

The London Oratory School has been found to have broken broken an unprecedented 105 aspects of the School Admissions Code. Photo: Wikimedia Commons
The London Oratory is just the latest faith school to use religion to exclude poor pupils
By Richy Thompson - 16 July 14:08

The Roman Catholic state school – which was attended by two of Tony Blair’s children and where Nick Clegg’s son is currently a pupil – has been censured for using a faith-based entry system to cherrypick white, privileged pupils.

We need to be braver and more radical in finding solutions. Photo: Getty
Homelessness will not be solved by building private homes – we need a radical solution
By Leslie Morphy - 15 July 13:22

After a decade advocating for homeless people at the helm of Crisis, Leslie Morphy has a message for government.

"I am one of thousands of women to have suffered – widows, orphans, victims of sexual abuse and rape".
“My son was killed... but it strengthened my commitment”
By Lucy Fisher - 11 July 11:36

Despite tragedy, two Afghan women explain how they refuse to be cowed by militants from carrying out their work.

MailOnline is “the benchmark of anonymous bullying, abuse and grammatically incorrect barbs”.
“Your family are losers and your children are adopted”: what it’s like to write for MailOnline
By Grant Feller - 09 July 11:17

Grant Feller thought he knew what he was getting into when he wrote about his new life as a stay-at-home dad for MailOnline – but the vileness of the response surpassed his wildest expectations.

A smear test can trap a survivor in unstoppable and violent memories. Photo: Getty
Why rape survivors often refuse cervical smears - even if it risks their lives
By Pavan Amara - 08 July 15:29

Cervical smear tests aren’t just stressful for rape survivors – they can trigger powerful flashbacks and violent memories. But avoiding a test can mean preserving your mental health at the risk of your physical well-being.

Rising cities.
If you want to go to university, you’re better off poor in London than rich anywhere else
By Haf Davies - 07 July 13:00

Reports show that London schools are outperforming the rest of the country. And it’s not just London - the “city effect” is improving results in Birmingham and Manchester too.

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt. Photo: Getty
Diagnosing cancer: why shaming and blaming GPs isn’t about improving patient safety
By Jonathon Tomlinson - 01 July 13:58

Cancer very often presents in ways we don’t expect. Creating a culture of fear around diagnosis isn’t a good thing.

How exactly is England hurt by Scottish independence? Photo: Getty
Wise up England, you’d be better off without Scotland
By Bryan Glass - 01 July 11:14

There are several powerful reasons why the English should accept or even be enthusiastic about the Scots going it alone when they vote at the end of the summer.

What is cyberbullying?
What is cyberbullying?
By Aoife Moriarty - 01 July 10:33

Cyberbullying became a major subject last year after a number of teen suicides linked to social network Ask.fm. But what is it, and how can we prevent young people from abusing each other online?

Rebekah Brooks arriving at the Old Bailey in May 2014. Photo: Getty
The presumption of innocence: why we shouldn’t assume it was wrong to charge Rebekah Brooks
By Carl Gardner - 25 June 10:13

The gap between accusation and guilt is not a bug in our criminal justice: it’s a necessary and desirable feature.

A woman holds a banner as she takes part in a "slut walk" in London in 2012. Photo: Getty
Nigel Evans and Ben Sullivan are wrong: rape suspects should not be given anonymity
By Willard Foxton - 24 June 15:24

From 1976 until 1988, both sides in sexual cases had anonymity. The Thatcher government – not generally known for its strong stand on women’s rights – repealed it, because it had appalling consequences.

The welfare of sex workers themselves needs to be the prime concern. Photo: Getty
The biggest myths about street-based sex work
By Clare Jones - 23 June 10:27

No, not all prostitutes get paid loads - and they're aren't all on drugs or from Eastern Europe. To make better policy around street-based sex work, we must first understand the reality of what it involves.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Getty
The Sudanese dictatorship: twenty-five years of impunity
By Martin Plaut - 20 June 12:50

Once, the plight of Darfur’s two million refugees would have made front page news. Today they seldom make even a paragraph in the inside pages of British broadsheets, although the repression continues unabated.

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